2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - Coolness Factor = 78.8%

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2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - Coolness Factor = 78.8%

Unread post by totalmotorcycle » Tue Oct 11, 2016 10:57 am

2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR on the Total Motorcycle Cool Wall

For MORE information and Photos click here: http://www.totalmotorcycle.com/motorcyc ... 1100RR.htm

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2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR on http://www.Totalmotorcycle.com

For the fastest and sportiest naked ever...

A direct descendant of the RSV4, four-time World SBK champion, a new evolutionary step has arrived which allows exceptional levels of performance to be achieved.


The new, sophisticated electronic management includes an advanced dynamic controls package with APRC, cornering ABS, pit limiter and cruise control.


The inimitable 175 HP V4 earns Euro 4 approval, without sacrificing any of its superb performance. Suspension and brakes have been improved.


The Tuono V4 family of motorbikes is made up of two distinctly outfitted models. Tuono V4 1100 RR represents an exceptional thrill machine, the heir to a dynasty of naked sport bikes acclaimed by critics as the most effective and fastest bike in its segment.

Tuono V4 1100 Factory is the more exclusive version, dedicated to an extremely demanding public; this bike is equipped with components which are largely derived from the Aprilia RSV4 RF superbike. The evolutionary step that Aprilia presents for 2017 involves both models which, as before, therefore continue to stand out for their factory outfitting and the graphics.


There are big innovations in the on board electronics department. Aprilia Performance Ride Control is the patented control suite derived directly from the winning technology in world Superbike, the most complete and refined of those available on the market. The fourth generation of APRC, standard on the Tuono V4 1100, fits in perfectly with the fine electronic management of the new, full Ride-by-Wire throttle.


The Tuono V4 1100 is now fitted with the advanced multimap Cornering ABS system, developed in collaboration with Bosch to guarantee maximum safety on the road, without sacrificing any performance on the track. The new ABS system works in unison with the Aprilia RLM (Rear Liftup Mitigation) system that limits the lift of the rear wheel during more abrupt braking. Cornering ABS, fine-tuned in accordance with Aprilia's specific indications, is adjustable to three levels of sensibility and can be switched off. In order to allow riders with various levels of experience to find the best possible combination, each of the three Cornering ABS maps can be combined with any of the three new engine maps (Sport, Track, Race). The latter are all three "full power" and differ in the way they dole out the 175 HP of which the Aprilia V4 is capable, in addition to the percentage of engine brake dedicated to them.




BIKE


The fastest and sportiest naked

The latest and most spectacular evolution of a sport naked dynasty, born in 2002 out of Aprilia's intuition to strip down and fit a handlebar on their flagship superbike (which at the time was the V-twin RSV mille), thereby combining all the advantages of a chassis par excellence with the fun of sitting up and dynamic riding. The patriarch of the new “supernaked” category was called the Tuono 1000 R, the first ultra high performance naked. Aprilia Tuono has therefore always been a high handlebar superbike, unbeatable on the track and loads of fun on the road.

The know-how acquired in years of victorious competition at top levels and the experience of the Tuono history now allow Aprilia to exceed limits which had previously seemed insurmountable: introducing the Tuono V4 1100, an exclusive thrill generator and fun in its purest state. 175 HP engine with a powerful maximum torque of 121 Nm, revamped chassis setup to achieve better agility, fine tuned APRC, new look, the possibility of connecting your smartphone to the vehicle through the V4-MP platform.



ENGINE


Higher performance than the V4


The primary goal of the changes made to the already extraordinary Aprilia Tuono V4 engine was to increase torque, especially at medium-low revs in order to increase effectiveness and riding pleasure on the road. To achieve this goal the engine capacity was increased to a full 1077 cc thanks to the cylinder bore which was taken from 78 to 81 mm. This increase in displacement also resulted in higher top performance: the power peak went from 170 to 175 HP and places the Tuono V4 1100 range at the top of its segment (already at 8,000 rpm almost 20 HP more than before are available). This makes the sport naked from Noale excel as a complete weapon for thrills and effectiveness with superlative torque values that dominate on the road and uncompromising top performance to dominate on the track.

The Tuono V4 1100 is the only naked powered by a 65° V4 engine° with unique characteristics. The narrow V architecture made it possible to build an engine with incredibly reduced longitudinal bulk which favours centring the weight and creating a compact chassis. As in previous models, the monobloc crankcase with integrated aluminium cylinder liners ensures maximum rigidity and consistent performance. The upper half of the engine case is now made with shell casting and has been lightened and reinforced; it also now has an optimised ventilation system in order to reduce power loss due to the internal pumping of the crankcase chambers. Also, the crankshaft now has connecting rod pins reduced to 36 mm in diameter with a weight increase of 0.45 Kg, the pistons are new and the Pankl connecting rods are lighter by a total of 400 grams.

The other technical particulars which made this engine so popular have remained unchanged, such as the removable gearbox and the innovative timing system kinematics: the chain camshaft drives only the intake camshaft which in turn drives the exhaust camshaft via a single gear. This solution allows for extremely compact heads especially in the area beneath the frame spars, much narrower than would otherwise be possible. A countershaft dampens vibrations even more than in a 90° V engine.

Full Ride by Wire technology eliminates any direct connection between the throttle grip and the throttle valves, which are entirely controlled by a latest generation Marelli control unit that also controls the ignition and the four injectors. Each bank is fuelled by two throttle bodies managed by a dedicated servo unit.

The powerful engine ECU now allows the three maps to be more easily managed, each one of which corresponds to a different engine power output and now also to a dedicated engine brake management map. The two classic engine management logics Track e Sport, are now joined by a Race map, the most extreme and suited for professional use of the bike on the track with engine braking control reduced to a minimum in order to support more abrupt braking. All three maps are more manageable and less aggressive than the previous version, allowing a better relationship between the opening of the throttle and the torque sent to the wheels. This is a solution that provides further advantages, such as reducing rear tyre wear and better management of the significant power that the Aprilia V4 is capable of developing.



FRAME


World Champion chassis


Simply incomparable, now more than ever. There is no other naked bike as sporty and effective as the Tuono V4 1100; its close derivation from the six-time world SBK champion is clear when you look at the beautiful double rail frame made from pressed and cast brushed aluminium elements, a structure that boasts unrivalled balance between torsional stiffness and flexibility; the 65° V4 engine is set inside it in all of its purity and uniqueness, just like a precious stone set in a ring. In order to make the Tuono V4 1100 more agile on the road, without losing its legendary fierceness on the track, the headstock angle was changed from 25.1° to 24.7° and the fork advancement went from 30 mm to 35 mm for a trail that went from 107.4 mm to 99.7 mm. These sleeker chassis dimensions combine with the 4 mm longer aluminium swingarm, the various suspension setups and the consequent adjustment of the electronic controls, including the wheelie control feature, to obtain a rock solid chassis at high speeds but more agile in direction changes.



Tuono V4 1100 RR is fitted with a high quality suspension: the upside-down Sachs fork with 43 mm stanchions has separate “one by one” hydraulic adjustments in compression and rebound as well as spring preload adjustment on both stanchions. The Sachs shock absorber with built-in piggy back allows the hydraulics to be adjusted in rebound and compression, as well as spring preload adjustment. The standard calibration on both units is functional to the increased performance of the V4 engine and the revamped chassis dimensions and it also takes into consideration use of the bike on the road without any prejudice to the possibility of personalisation in order to obtain maximum accuracy and precision in true racing style riding.



The more refined Factory version of the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 comes with par excellence standard equipment unique in its category, borrowed from the king of superbike, the Aprilia RSV4 RF. The suspension section is made up of a trio of Öhlins elements (fork, rear shock absorber and steering damper) characterised by ultra fine tuning possibilities and a base setup that has been calibrated to give the rider maximum performance feedback in sport riding.





The braking system on the Tuono V4 1100 has a pair of refined Brembo monobloc M432 callipers on the front which mounts pads with the best possible friction coefficient that grip lightweight aluminium flanged discs (for Tuono V4 1100 Factory). The cast aluminium wheel rims are the same for both models: their lightweight quality contributes to a maximum reduction of the gyroscopic effect, all to the advantage of great handling. Tuono V4 1100 Factory is shod with the sportier Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa, with a wider 200/55 on the rear, in any case approved for street use and available for the Tuono V4 RR as well.



TECHNOLOGY


APRC The top of the line in electronic controls



The Tuono V4 1100 range has received all the upgrades to the already exceptional APRC system that was first seen on the RSV4 RR and RSV4 RF.

As everyone knows, APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) is the patented control systems package derived directly from the winning technology in the world Superbike championship, the most complete and refined of any on the market, which provides tyre circumference self-calibration features and wheelie control. The third generation of APRC, standard equipment on the Tuono V4 1100 units, fully integrates with the fine full Ride-by-Wire multimap electronic management of the revamped V4 engine. As always, the Tuono V4 benefits from a specifically developed calibration, but it has been evolved even further in order to provide maximum thrills on the road and maximum performance on the track.



The Tuono V4 1100 RR and Tuono V4 1100 Factory APRC include:

- ATC: Aprilia Traction Control, adjustable on the fly, (without having to release the throttle) to 8 settings thanks to a practical joystick on the left side of the handlebar, now has even more fine tuned and higher performance operating logic. The percentage of slippage allowed also differs depending on the speed in the turn: the system's performance is smoother and guarantees high support in long sweepers at high speeds without penalising grip coming out of slow turns;

- AWC: Aprilia Wheelie Control,with 3 selectable settings, has been recalibrated to be even more sporty in map 1, whilst still guaranteeing a slight lift in quick acceleration and subsequent smoother descent of the front wheel to the tarmac;

- ALC: Aprilia Launch Control, the assisted starting system for use on the track only with 3 settings;

- AQS: Aprilia Quick Shift electronic gearbox for ultra-fast shifting without closing the throttle or using the clutch.



In addition to the third generation APRC, the Tuono V4 1100 range is fitted with the highly advanced Race ABS system, developed in collaboration with Bosch to guarantee maximum safety on the road, without sacrificing any performance on the track. The 9MP system, which weighs in at just 2 kg, uses an actuation strategy called RLM (Rear wheel Lift-up Mitigation) that, as the name suggests, mitigates rear wheel lift in more abrupt braking situations; it can also be disengaged and it is adjustable to three levels easily by accessing the control menu on the instrument cluster.



- Level 1: this is dedicated to track use but is also approved for street use. It acts on both wheels to guarantee the best possible performance, even in the most intense braking conditions at any speed. It takes nothing away from the pleasure and performance of “extreme” riding. With this strategy RLM is disabled.

- Level 2: this is dedicated to sport riding on the road, acts on both wheels and is combined with the RLM tip over system which engages progressively based on the vehicle speed.

- Level 3: this is dedicated to riding on surfaces with poor grip, acts on both wheels and is combined with the RLM tip over system.



Each of these three Race ABS maps can be combined with any of the three engine maps (Track, Sport, Race), in order to allow riders with different experience and skill levels to find the best possible combination for their style.



DESIGN

Tuono V4 1100 RR is available in two attractive colour schemes, grigio Portimao and blu Donington



FOR THE FASTEST AND SPORTIEST NAKED EVER, A DIRECT DESCENDANT OF THE RSV4, FOUR-TIME WORLD SBK CHAMPION, A NEW EVOLUTIONARY STEP HAS ARRIVED WHICH ALLOWS EXCEPTIONAL LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE TO BE ACHIEVED. THE NEW, SOPHISTICATED ELECTRONIC MANAGEMENT INCLUDES AN ADVANCED DYNAMIC CONTROLS PACKAGE WITH APRC, CORNERING ABS, PIT LIMITER AND CRUISE CONTROL
THE INIMITABLE 175 HP V4 EARNS EURO 4 APPROVAL, WITHOUT SACRIFICING ANY OF ITS SUPERB PERFORMANCE. IMPROVED SUSPENSION AND BRAKES.


Simply unrivalled. Now more than ever. The Aprilia naked range, heir to a family of motorbikes which has been voted over time as one of the most adrenaline pumping and efficient bikes ever, achieves absolute performance levels and sophistication, thanks to Aprilia's know-how acquired over years of winning premier level competitions and the experience of the Tuono history, which is thus confirmed as the only superbike stripped down and fitted with a high handlebar, unbeatable on the track and loads of fun on the road. The Tuono V4 family of motorbikes is made up of two distinctly outfitted models. Tuono V4 1100 RR represents an exceptional thrill machine, the heir to a dynasty of naked sport bikes acclaimed by critics as the most effective and fastest bike in its segment. Tuono V4 1100 Factory is the more exclusive version, dedicated to an extremely demanding public; this bike is equipped with components which are largely derived from the Aprilia RSV4 RF superbike. The evolutionary step that Aprilia presents for 2017 involves both models that, as before, therefore continue to stand out for their factory outfitting and the graphics.


Completely revamped electronics

The greatest innovations have to do with the Aprilia Tuono V4's on board electronics, that has always been considered as the "best in class", where the APRC system stands out. Aprilia Performance Ride Control is the patented control suite derived directly from the winning technology in world Superbike, the most complete and refined of those available on the market. The fourth generation of APRC, standard on the Tuono V4 1100, fits in perfectly with the fine electronic management of the new full Ride-by-Wire throttle, that has allowed all superfluous throttle body electronic management components to be eliminated, thereby saving 590 grams. The repositioning of the inertial platform that allows APRC operation has improved accurate detection of the dynamic conditions of the bike, resulting in more efficient electronic control strategies.



2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - http://www.Totalmotorcycle.com USA Specifications/Technical Details
US MSRP Price: See dealer for pricing in USD
Canada MSRP Price: $15,595 CDN
Europe/UK MSRP Price: £ 13,236 (On The Road inc 20% Vat)


Engine type Aprilia longitudinal 65° V4 cylinder, 4-stroke, liquid cooled engine with dual overhead cam (DOHC) and four valves per cylinder
Fuel Unleaded petrol
Bore and stroke 81 x 52.3 mm
Total engine capacity 1077 cc
Maximum power at crankshaft 175 HP (129 kW) at 11,000 rpm
Maximum torque at crankshaft 121 Nm at 9,000 rpm
Fuel system Airbox with front dynamic air intakes.
4 Weber-Marelli 48-mm throttle bodies with 4 injectors and latest generation Ride-by-Wire engine management that the rider can select on the fly. T (Track), S (Sport), R (Race)
Ignition Magneti Marelli digital electronic ignition system integrated in engine control system, with one spark plug per cylinder and "stick-coil"-type coils
Starter Electrical
Exhaust 4 into 2 into 1 layout, two oxygen sensors, lateral single silencer with ECU-controlled bypass valve and integrated trivalent catalytic converter (Euro 4).
Generator Flywheel mounted 450 W alternator with rare earth magnets
Lubrication Wet sump lubrication system with oil radiator and two oil pumps (lubrication and cooling)
Gearbox 6-speed cassette type gearbox
1st: 39/15 (2.600)
2nd: 33/16 (2.063)
3rd: 34/20 (1.700)
4th: 32/22 (1.455)
5th: 34/26 (1.308)
6th: 33/27 (1.222)
Gear lever with Aprilia Quick Shift electronic system (AQS)

Clutch Multiplate wet clutch with slipper system.
Primary drive Straight cut gears and integrated flexible coupling, drive ratio: 73/44 (1.659)
Secondary drive Chain: Drive ratio: 42/15 (2.8)
Traction management
APRC System (Aprilia Performance Ride Control), which includes Traction Control (ATC), Wheelie Control (AWC), Launch Control (ALC), cruise control (ACC) and speed limiter (APL), all of which can be configured and deactivated independently
Transport frame Aluminium dual beam chassis with pressed and cast sheet elements.
Sachs steering damper
Front suspension Upside-down "one by one" Sachs fork, Ø 43 mm stanchions. Forged aluminium radial calliper mounting bracket. Completely adjustable spring preload and hydraulic compression and rebound damping. Wheel travel: 120 mm
Rear suspension Double braced aluminium swingarm; mixed low thickness and sheet casting technology.
Sachs monoshock with piggy-back, fully adjustable in: spring preload, hydraulics in compression and rebound. APS progressive linkages. Wheel travel: 130 mm
Brakes Front: Dual 330 mm floating stainless steel discs with lightweight stainless steel rotor with 6 M50 4 32 studs. Brembo M432 monobloc radial callipers with 4 Ø 30 mm opposing pistons Sintered pads. Radial pump and metal braided brake lines
Rear: 220 mm diameter disc; Brembo floating calliper with two Ø 32 mm separate pistons. Sintered pads. Master cylinder with built in reservoir and metal braided hose.
Bosch 9.1 MP ABS with cornering function, adjustable on 3 maps, featuring RLM strategy and can be disengaged.
Wheel rims Cast aluminium wheels with 3 split spoke design.
Front: 3.5"X17"
Rear: 6.00"X17"
Tyres Radial tubeless.
Front: 120/70 ZR 17
Rear: 190/55 ZR 17 (alternative: 190/50 ZR 17; 200/55 ZR 17)
Dimensions
Saddle height: 825 mm
Trail: 99.7 mm
Steering angle: 24.7°
Fuel tank 18.5 litres (4-litre reserve included)


For MORE information and Photos click here: http://www.totalmotorcycle.com/motorcyc ... 1100RR.htm
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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by High_Side » Fri Oct 14, 2016 10:36 pm

The boss man is moving this week so I've posted this a little late. Enjoy!

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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by ZRex » Sat Oct 15, 2016 3:17 am

Awesome, Awesome, Awesome, if there were anything higher I would have picked that.

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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by ceemes » Sat Oct 15, 2016 9:26 am

Nice...but woooo......far too many electronics.....I mean WTF, traction control, launch control, wheelie control?????.......IMHO the only electronic assistance that should be allowed on a bike is ABS....nice, sexy looking, lots of grunt....but far too many electronics that take away from what riding is all about and can go wrong in the middle of no where.......give it a solid cool......lose the electronic aids (apart from the ABS) and it would be awesome.
Always ask why.

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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by montanalifter » Sat Oct 15, 2016 11:48 am

I think the point of all the electronic aids is to make this bike very fast and more safe for your average rider. Like the zx14 I had if you twist too hard on the throttle it would break traction and spin the back tire did not matter if you were leaned over in a turn or not. And rain you had to really be careful. Mine was an 08 without the traction control, etc. A lot of these bikes you can turn some of this off if you do not want it but I feel if it was me I would a least keep some of the intervention. I voted awesome. To me the whole point of this bike is to go insanely fast and I am sure that is exactly what it does.

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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by ceemes » Sat Oct 15, 2016 4:55 pm

montanalifter wrote:I think the point of all the electronic aids is to make this bike very fast and more safe for your average rider. Like the zx14 I had if you twist too hard on the throttle it would break traction and spin the back tire did not matter if you were leaned over in a turn or not. And rain you had to really be careful. Mine was an 08 without the traction control, etc. A lot of these bikes you can turn some of this off if you do not want it but I feel if it was me I would a least keep some of the intervention. I voted awesome. To me the whole point of this bike is to go insanely fast and I am sure that is exactly what it does.

So basically, all you need to ride fast is technology, not skills......got it......I use to own a '79 Ford Corba with a honking great 5.0 litre V8 engine and standard transmissions (stick and clutch) and to a very very light rear end and lets just say primitive suspension. It was a car that you had to give 100% of your attention to drive or else it would turn around and bite you on the a$$ (I spun it out once going too hot into a corner, luckily there was no traffic and nothing to hit.). I recently drove a more modern version of that car, one complete with all the bells and whistles and you know what, I didn't like it, as the skills I have weren't needed, the car basically did it all for me (until I turned all that sh1t off). All that tech does is allow a mediocre driver to handle such a machine, up to a point, after which they get into serious trouble. For bikes it is even worse, no keep all that tech in cars and off of bikes. Riders need to learn to control and master their machine, not have some machine do it for them.
Always ask why.

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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by High_Side » Sun Oct 16, 2016 12:31 am

ceemes wrote:
montanalifter wrote:I think the point of all the electronic aids is to make this bike very fast and more safe for your average rider. Like the zx14 I had if you twist too hard on the throttle it would break traction and spin the back tire did not matter if you were leaned over in a turn or not. And rain you had to really be careful. Mine was an 08 without the traction control, etc. A lot of these bikes you can turn some of this off if you do not want it but I feel if it was me I would a least keep some of the intervention. I voted awesome. To me the whole point of this bike is to go insanely fast and I am sure that is exactly what it does.

So basically, all you need to ride fast is technology, not skills......got it......I use to own a '79 Ford Corba with a honking great 5.0 litre V8 engine and standard transmissions (stick and clutch) and to a very very light rear end and lets just say primitive suspension. It was a car that you had to give 100% of your attention to drive or else it would turn around and bite you on the a$$ (I spun it out once going too hot into a corner, luckily there was no traffic and nothing to hit.). I recently drove a more modern version of that car, one complete with all the bells and whistles and you know what, I didn't like it, as the skills I have weren't needed, the car basically did it all for me (until I turned all that sh1t off). All that tech does is allow a mediocre driver to handle such a machine, up to a point, after which they get into serious trouble. For bikes it is even worse, no keep all that tech in cars and off of bikes. Riders need to learn to control and master their machine, not have some machine do it for them.
While I get tired of reading about ride modes and electronic rider aids in magazine tests, they do serve a real purpose and you do not have to be lacking skills to appreciate them. My old Superduke 990 is one of the rawest streetbikes I have ever ridden and if you are not careful it WILL dump you on your "O Ring". Great fun but at 120hp and it's light weight it is about at the limit of hairiness that I can honestly enjoy. When they came out with the 1290 Superduke at somewhere around 180 hp it had to have some kind of supervisory controls or KTM would have been sued out of business. I have ridden the 1290 and it is hella fast but nowhere near as dangerous as my 990. For me it is less thrilling too and since riding one I have not been tempted to trade. But the 1290 is much faster AND much safer even for a very experienced rider. The electronics not only work but also make the possibility of riding a 180hp on the street feasible.

As for riders mastering and controlling their machines, even riders at the highest level of Moto-GP are much faster with the electronics. They are the best in the world and they now crash less and go a lot faster than before they had them.

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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by Grey Thumper » Mon Oct 17, 2016 9:58 pm

ceemes wrote:Nice...but woooo......far too many electronics.....I mean WTF, traction control, launch control, wheelie control?????.......IMHO the only electronic assistance that should be allowed on a bike is ABS....nice, sexy looking, lots of grunt....but far too many electronics that take away from what riding is all about and can go wrong in the middle of no where.......give it a solid cool......lose the electronic aids (apart from the ABS) and it would be awesome.
I was on the same boat. I didn't see the point of all that stuff because, well, I don't exactly ride to maximize my performance, so launch control, wheelie control, etc aren't relevant to me. I appreciate ABS because it comes into play specifically during emergencies. If you're situationally aware and riding within the limits dictated by road, traffic, and environmental conditions, you should hardly ever activate ABS. But there's still the "you never know" factor. The last time I saw my ABS light flashing was a few years ago, when some wildlife bounded across the road. Some things are just truly unpredictable.

Anyway, I've gradually come around and included traction control as one of those "you never know when you'll need it" features. I didn't see the point before; if you see that you're in a low traction environment, just back off a bit. Simple. But having recently gotten a bike with traction control, yeah, I appreciate that it comes into play when I'm rounding an otherwise normal corner, and suddenly there's sand, wet leaves, or (since you're familiar with the Philippines, Ceemes) freaking rice husks on the road. Gaaah, hate those. But I still appreciate being able to turn off traction control and ABS, especially when I'm taking that bike off pavement.

Anyway, as for the Aprilia itself, I'd never buy one, but it's still awesome. A relatively comfortable standard with a characterful engine and insane performance. What's not to like?
"If you ride like there's no tomorrow, there won't be."

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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by ceemes » Tue Oct 18, 2016 6:26 am

Grey Thumper wrote:
ceemes wrote:Nice...but woooo......far too many electronics.....I mean WTF, traction control, launch control, wheelie control?????.......IMHO the only electronic assistance that should be allowed on a bike is ABS....nice, sexy looking, lots of grunt....but far too many electronics that take away from what riding is all about and can go wrong in the middle of no where.......give it a solid cool......lose the electronic aids (apart from the ABS) and it would be awesome.
I was on the same boat. I didn't see the point of all that stuff because, well, I don't exactly ride to maximize my performance, so launch control, wheelie control, etc aren't relevant to me. I appreciate ABS because it comes into play specifically during emergencies. If you're situationally aware and riding within the limits dictated by road, traffic, and environmental conditions, you should hardly ever activate ABS. But there's still the "you never know" factor. The last time I saw my ABS light flashing was a few years ago, when some wildlife bounded across the road. Some things are just truly unpredictable.

Anyway, I've gradually come around and included traction control as one of those "you never know when you'll need it" features. I didn't see the point before; if you see that you're in a low traction environment, just back off a bit. Simple. But having recently gotten a bike with traction control, yeah, I appreciate that it comes into play when I'm rounding an otherwise normal corner, and suddenly there's sand, wet leaves, or (since you're familiar with the Philippines, Ceemes) freaking rice husks on the road. Gaaah, hate those. But I still appreciate being able to turn off traction control and ABS, especially when I'm taking that bike off pavement.

Anyway, as for the Aprilia itself, I'd never buy one, but it's still awesome. A relatively comfortable standard with a characterful engine and insane performance. What's not to like?

Truth be told mate, driving in the Philippine with a cage surrounding my bod was hairy enough, don't think I could ride there, I'd be too busy pulling over every five minute to change my knickers........
Always ask why.

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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by Hanson » Tue Oct 18, 2016 9:20 am

I would consider Moto GP riders to have significant skills.

A few quotes about traction control with attribution to Cycle World;
  • Nicky Hayden: “With the bikes we are riding now, you need some electronics. Consider 270 hp! The level is so high that you cannot ride without traction control, but I would prefer to have less electronics.”

    
Jorge Lorenzo: “I prefer to stick with the traction control. I can control the bike, but the power of a MotoGP machine is huge, more than 250 hp, so you need some help. Without traction control, it would be impossible to ride these machines. Traction control also means more safety. Sometimes the bike reacts differently to your way of riding, but for sure traction control always saves the crash. Even with traction control we sometimes struggle to keep the grip on the rear tire, so I think it would be almost impossible to ride our bikes without it.”

    Valentino Rossi: “I have always loved to ride bikes with less electronics, and I can say that it was really great to race with those machines. But it is great also nowadays. It is incredible how fast we can ride with our machines, especially in the corner. Maybe the races were different when we were riding bikes without it or with less traction control. Now we can ride really fast from the first to the very last lap. This means that you have to be totally concentrated throughout the whole race. A mistake is not allowed. I think we are speaking about two different eras and, I like them both.”
So ... it is not just low skilled riders that can ride faster and safer with electronic intervention, it is the most skilled riders in the world who can ride faster and safer with electronic intervention.

As a low skilled rider, I am quite interested in any technology that will help mitigate the risks of riding a motorcycle. The more powerful the motorcycle, the greater the benefit derived from various forms of electron intervention. Even then, I am not a fast rider and in truth I don't even have a desire to be a fast rider. I do, however, have a very strong and intense interest in returning safely home every time I go for a ride on my motorcycle and one significant aspect of achieving that end is not allowing ego to impact my choices.

I am a very low skilled very slow rider and I will happily take advantage of any available technology which will improve my chances of surviving each and every motorcycle ride.

Oh ... I do see my ABS indicator light up every time I go out and practice maximum effort strops, something I do about every two months, but not so much when I am on a ride. If you never see your ABS indicator turn on, then it might be a good idea to go spend some time in a car park.

Safe Travels,
Richard Hanson
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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by High_Side » Tue Oct 18, 2016 2:19 pm

Hanson wrote:I would consider Moto GP riders to have significant skills.

Safe Travels,
Richard Hanson
Excellent post. We need a "like" button!

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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by totalmotorcycle » Fri Oct 21, 2016 8:50 am

I'm back. (anyone miss me?). We just did a big cross-country move from Calgary, Alberta to Waterloo, Ontario. Drove the 4 days to get here, was a great trip and we are indeed lucky to live (or to ride) in such a beautifully diverse country, like Canada and the USA. Moving truck still in transit and hopefully I can get off the air mattress and onto a real bed soon!!

For the Tuono V4, absolutely love it myself, but like many here, I don't share the joy of fancy electronics between me and the road. It's one of the reasons I love my '13 Guzzi V7 so much, just me and the road, no ABS, no traction control, launch control or other do-dads, it's even a honest air-cooled only engine. But that doesn't mean I don't miss those options either, there are some times under hard acceleration that I'll brake my rear tire loose in 2nd gear or lock the rear up at a stop, thus the V7II has all that and more. As Rossi says, it's a different riding era to have an analogue motorcycle, one that has nearly ended. Some may say this is a good thing, but I'll miss it, it honed my riding skills to what they are today BECAUSE I got to ride an analogue bike and one era I wouldn't trade.

I do agree, as bikes get more and more powerful they are getting harder to control and it is quickly becoming a necessary evil... AT LEAST we still have manual transmissions available and they haven't gone away like they are in cars! In fact, for all our new and fancy bike electronics, we are still behind in safety on a bike vs a car, but over the last 10 years we are really catching up in some fronts.

That said, I think the Tuono looks great, offers a ton of great features and at a really great price. Lovely engine too. A++

Mike
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Re: This Week: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - VOTE NOW

Unread post by totalmotorcycle » Fri Oct 21, 2016 9:53 am

High_Side wrote:
Hanson wrote:I would consider Moto GP riders to have significant skills.

Safe Travels,
Richard Hanson
Excellent post. We need a "like" button!

Working on it. As soon as the new Web 2.0/3.0 website conversion is done, we should have it (or something like it).

Mike
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Re: 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR

Unread post by totalmotorcycle » Fri Oct 28, 2016 8:22 am

2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR - Coolness Factor = 78.8%
Featured: October 14th to October 21st, 2016
Most popular vote category: Awesome

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Motorcycle Cool Wall discussion: viewtopic.php?f=61&t=53741
Total Motorcycle model page: http://www.totalmotorcycle.com/motorcyc ... 1100RR.htm

Your Coolness Factor of the 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR is:

Awesome (3 points) 55% [ 6 ]
Cool (2 points) 36% [ 4 ]
Uncool (1 point) 0% [ 0 ]
Fail (0 point) 9% [ 1 ]

Total votes: 11

= a Coolwall Factor of 78.8%


Notes: An absolutely outstanding discussion this week with the 2017 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR! While the votes where low (that's my fault, I was away moving and I couldn't update the main page), the discussion was HOT, HOT, HOT. And not just about the Tuono, but also about the future of motorcycle electronics, nanny systems and where things are headed. Is this truly the end of the era of analog riding?

Get excited as the next TMW Cool Wall bike for 2016 is now up for voting and discussion, have fun!
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