MotoFizz Camping Seat Bag

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keysman
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MotoFizz Camping Seat Bag

Unread post by keysman » Wed Mar 16, 2005 11:03 pm

Product: MotoFizz Camping Seat Bag
Product Type: Luggage
Manufacturer: MotoFizz
URL: http://www.aerostich.com/product.php?pr ... 280&page=1
Product Rating: 9 (out of 10)

Price: $137.00 for the medium or $157.00 for the large bag.

Image

This is one very capable seat bag. I will say, "I love this bag."

The MotoFizz Camping Seat Bag is available in the United States through AeroStich / RiderWearhouse. I believe they are the exclusive importer of this product to the United States from Japan. The AeroStich catalog calls this bag, "... the world's most advanced motorcycle pack." They go on to say, "It's an armed F-16 in a field of Cessna's." I will go on record as saying, "I wholeheartedly agree with their assessment." "I love this bag."

The bag comes in two sizes Medium and Large. I opted for the medium bag who's dimensions measure 12" x 12" x 14". The large bag weighs in at 14" x 14" x 25". The medium bag provided me with plenty of room to store my essentials for a three day trip and I packed quite a bit of stuff. Do those dimensions still sound too small for your needs? Are you planing a trip from Mexico City to Anchorage? Well have no fear, each of the bags feature gusseted zippers on both ends of the bag allowing expansion of 5 inches per side or 10 inches overall. Expanded the medium bag measures 12" x 12" x 24" and the large bag measures 14" x 14" x 35".

The bag can be opened a number of ways for the utmost convenience. The cylindrical shaped bag features a zippered opening on each end of the cylinder. Two zippers meet around the edge and allow you to pack or unpack the bag from either end. You will also find a retention strap on the inside of the bag allowing the end to open only 90 degrees preventing your stuff stored in the inside pockets of the end flaps from falling on the ground when you open the bag while it is still mounted to the bike. A feature I learned to appreciate the first day of my trip. Pulling back the top flap and undoing the zipper will allow access into the top of the bag. I found it best to pack the things I needed most frequently in one of the end pockets. I kept wipes for my shield, a first aid kit, granola bars and other snacks in these pockets. I also packed a rather large SLR digital camera on this trip and I kept it wrapped in a towel near the top of the bag and while access wasn't quite as easy as needed at some points during the trip, I felt like my camera was safe and secure from too much vibration and possible damage.

Straps and straps some more. This bag is loaded with straps! When I first looked at the bag, I was a little overwhelmed by the number I found. After a few short minutes packing the bag, I found that the straps were not too intrusive and offer a lot of convenience. First you'll find there are four plastic buckles that flank the four lower corners of the bag. These four buckles provide connection points for the the four provided nylon tie down straps. The straps have the receptacle part of the buckle on one end an a closed loop at the other. You simply loop the strap around a bar on your bike (I found the bar for the passenger pegs worked good for the front) and pass the buckle end of the strap through the closed loop. This secures the strap to your bike. Fasten the buckle to the one on the bag and cinch it down. The bag was very stable on the seat with the four straps cinched down and it did not shift the entire trip. You'll also find many straps designed to cinch the bag down to keep it's shape and prevent it from flapping in the wind regardless of how much or how little you have packed inside the bag. There are two small straps with buckles on the inside of the bag that help the bag keep it's shape, tighten them down and the two long sides will be pulled together around your clothing or whatever you have packed in there. There are two more large adjustable straps over opening ends of the bag. Three more secure the top flap of the bag and do the most to keep things tight and secure. Finally there are to smaller straps that will allow you to secure a bedroll along side of the MotoFizz bag. I tried to secure my sleeping bag with these straps and they were not quite long enough to wrap around the bag even after I rolled the bag tighter than Darth Vader's death grip. It's a shame too because the sleeping bag would have fit nicely parallel to the bag over the top of my tail rack.

There are a few more features that finish off this already top notch bag. The bottom of the bag features a soft but almost sticky fabric surface that helps keep the bag firmly planted on the seat. One end of the bag features an external pocket that's great for things you might need to quickly access. You sport bike hooligans will want to keep your drivers license and registration in this pocket. The other end of the bag includes a small removable bag which looks a little like a small purse. Hey were talking convenience here guys, don't worry about looking like a sissy. All of the zippers have a bright yellow heavy-duty fabric tab attached to the ends. This makes them easy to locate quickly and easy to open even with your gloves on. There is a mesh of bungee cord over the top flap on the bag. This is good to quickly store something like a sweater you have shed because the weather has changed. You even find and insulated bottle holder on the outside of the bag. I kept a bottle of water in there the entire trip for quick access at any stopping point. If all that is not enough there are several D-Ring loops outside the bag to attach bungee cords or whatever you see fit.

You even find a storage area under the top flap which according to the pictures in the instructions looks like it was designed for groceries. All of the instructions are on the cardboard poster inside the retail packaging. They are all in Japanese. AeroStich does provide a rather small english translation but the keyword here is small. It does not cover all of the instructions found on on the Japanese insert. One last little bit included in the package are these two nylon straps that are attached in the middle by a fastener that allows you to rotate the two straps about the center. Each strap is only about 4 inches long and has a buckle on both ends. So basically your looking at this little 4 inch plus sign. There is an illustration of this part on the cardboard insert but I had no idea how to use it, until I pulled the bag off the bike. With the bag removed from the bike you'll be left with the four straps that were holding it in place still attached to your bike. If your bike is setup just right, you'll be able to attach the ends of the four straps to the four buckles on the little plus sign and ride without having to take the straps off the bike frame. The little plus sign holds them tight and keeps them away from things like your tailpipe and your rear wheel.

I also want to mention that the service and pre-sales support that I received from AeroStich was excellent. I sent several emails to the company and they were all promptly answered by a member of the sales support staff at AeroStich. The individual even went out to the warehouse and made additional measurements of the bag before I placed my order at my request. I was very happy with their service. I also have to say the AeroStich / RiderWarehouse offers just about the best selection of motorcycle accessories I have found. Browse their website or order their catalog and you'll see what I mean.

Was this review helpful to you? Please post and let us know.
Last edited by keysman on Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post by scan » Mon Mar 13, 2006 10:41 am

I know this is an older review, and it was very good to read, but I'd like to see this bag on a bike. I'm sure it is the kind of thing I want, but I need to see how it looks loaded. I know my existing tail bag is a little small for a weekend, and I hate having to load my Joe Rocket saddlebags. They are great bags, but they are in a very bad place if it rains, and the waterproof covers - well they are not really waterproof. I can't find a picture of the Moto Fizz on a bike anywhere on the Internet.
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Unread post by HexedWrench » Mon Mar 13, 2006 2:25 pm

I just took a peek at this on the Aerostich site and it seems they now also offer a small version at $127, which is 8" x 12" x 16"(20" expanded).
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Unread post by keysman » Sat Apr 08, 2006 11:07 pm

Sorry for the delay Scan but here are some pictures of the MotoFizz bag on my BMW F650CS.

Here it is on the back of my seat. I have a sleeping bag bungie'd to the back of the MotoFizz bag in the green pouch.
Image

Here is another shot of the bag.
Image

In this shot you can see the pocket for a bottle. I kept water in there, you can keep whatever you want in there.
Image
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Unread post by skoebl » Sun Apr 09, 2006 3:45 pm

That's really cool. I may have to get me one of those.

Btw, what's that fuzzy stuff on yoru seat? Looks comfy :D
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Unread post by scan » Sun Apr 09, 2006 10:19 pm

Thanks for the update with the pictures. Looks cool.
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Unread post by Lion_Lady » Tue Apr 11, 2006 9:16 am

Bungees, YIKES!!!

NO bungess, no bungees. Please.

Okay, that out of the way. Bungees can be lethal on a motorcycle, because the wind, or even a spirited turn, can make a load shift and that previously 'secured' item can end up in your wheel or chain and you'll experience a sudden and complete loss of forward power. Bulky, lightweight items can be as deadly as smaller heavier items.

The really unbelievable thing is that my hubby purchased a 'motorcycle' bag that actually had bungee straps as the only way to attach the bag to the bike. I was riding behind him and watched as the bag slid sideways on the pillion seat (he'd loaded one side of the bag heavier than the other) and nearly off into the wheel.

Use ROK straps or Helen2Wheels straps, or even those nylon webbing straps that can be found at camping stores.

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Unread post by keysman » Wed Apr 12, 2006 10:41 pm

I have never had a problem with anything shifting under one of the bungie webs. I didn't know this was an issue, I have never heard anyone warn against them before. I also make sure those things are cinched down as tight as I can get them. The bungie web was also used to secure the bedroll at the back of the bike to the bike's luggage rack and to the MotoFizz bag. The MotoFizz bag is secured to the bike using nylon straps and plastic release clips. The setup you see here withstood well over 1000 miles and sometimes above the legal limit.

That being said I'm open to the possibility that I'm just in the dark about this issue.
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Unread post by keysman » Sat Apr 15, 2006 10:47 am

skoebl wrote:Btw, what's that fuzzy stuff on yoru seat? Looks comfy :D
That is the Alaska Leather Sheepskin Butt Pad.
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Unread post by ladyreb » Wed Jul 19, 2006 7:20 am

Is this bag waterproof?

When I'm packing camping gear I always have 2 cargo straps on the heavier portion and use bungees too. So far I haven't had any trouble. But I ride a cruiser with a backrest. I currently use an army duffel bag with a waterproof insert from Walmart to haul my stuff. I've been looking at bags like this one and the ones that slide over the backrest too. They just don't seem to have as much room as my duffel bag.

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Unread post by keysman » Sat Nov 18, 2006 6:30 pm

It's not waterproof but it comes with a rain cover.
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Unread post by keysman » Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:46 pm

Thanks for the compliment Rob. I corrected the URL in the first post as well. I am still using this bag today and it works great for me. I don't use it as much because now I'm riding the FJR and the two hardbags hold the gear that I need most of the time.
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Unread post by mutineer » Sun Apr 08, 2007 7:37 pm

I have the same bag and have used it on everything from a dirtbike to a '04 Triumph Bonneville

the look of the bag is all wrong for a Bonneville (if you care about such things, which I am afraid I do) but the function is so good you overlook it

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Unread post by keysman » Thu Jul 05, 2007 1:50 pm

mutineer wrote:I have the same bag and have used it on everything from a dirtbike to a '04 Triumph Bonneville

the look of the bag is all wrong for a Bonneville (if you care about such things, which I am afraid I do) but the function is so good you overlook it
+1 on that. It actually looks a little better on my FJR than it did on the back of my BWM you see in these pictures.

There are now three sizes of this bag available from Aerostich so now you have even more choices.
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Motofizz bag - mystery piece

Unread post by whatcape » Wed Dec 26, 2007 5:56 pm

Hey, I know this is years old, but I just got a new bag. Your post was invaluable in solving the "plus sign" attachment piece. Makes total sense! Thanks.

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Any problems!

Unread post by cyclebiker » Fri May 09, 2008 12:25 pm

I've been looking for a good bag like this. Does the added weight on the tail change the handling of the bike at all.
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Unread post by keysman » Sun Nov 16, 2008 12:02 pm

I'm glad to hear people are still getting some use out of this review. The added weight might impact the ride a bit but regardless it weighs less than a pillion. Since it's a seat bag it might be less impact than one of those hard cases from Givi for example because those things attach beyond the rear seat. This puts the extra weight next to your back and closer to the center of the bike.

I don't ride aggressive enough to really notice a difference. It's never been a problem for me. Plus my FJR weighs so much I don't think I would really even notice the difference.
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Unread post by jstark47 » Wed Nov 19, 2008 12:38 am

They've added a third size, "small" since you wrote that review in '06. My wife has the large size, it's humongous. I can't really believe anyone needs to pack that much (especially on a bike that also has three hard cases) but she claims it's all necessary. She also claims it doesn't upset the handling of the bike. She does put her heaviest stuff in the sidecases which ride down low.

The bag is very well designed and made. The rain cover actually keeps out rain.
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Re: MotoFizz Camping Seat Bag

Unread post by traviss » Tue May 29, 2012 7:43 am

I like that camping seat bag. I think it's large enough to pack all gear stuff. Looks like it's very convenient to use.

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Re: MotoFizz Camping Seat Bag

Unread post by keysman » Sat Aug 04, 2012 8:15 pm

I'm still using mine and I'm still happy with it. It's held up pretty well. The only thing that's failed to stand the test of time are the elastic bungee laced cords. The wind has taken it's toll on them and they are not very elastic any more. Everything else is in great shape. That bag has rode a lot of miles on my back seat.
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