Oh so true!

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beemer_scoot
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Oh so true!

#1 Unread post by beemer_scoot » Fri Nov 02, 2007 6:34 am

I started riding again in 2000, after 19 years without a bike. Being honest here, I'm glad that I started out again with a lower horsepower, older bike. I'm convinced that saved me alot of pain and suffering.

About my third week on the bike, I had to pull out in traffic from between parked cars and I just could not see what was coming. I got nervous and this caused me to gun the bike more than I wanted too, and I ended up shooting all the way across the street. There's no doubt in my mind that if I'd have been on a sport bike I would have gotten hurt....big time!

Even the brakes on so many of these newer bikes are too powerful to learn on. I know of one guy that bought a big Harley to learn on. In a panic stop he managed to apply too much front brake and flipped that monster.

Motorcyles are fun! But the most important aspect of riding is to stay safe. You just can't overlook that. As far as I'm concerned, you're not an expert rider unless you've wrecked at least 20 bikes. You just don't know the limits of motorcycles until you've exceeded those limits. By that standard most all riders, even with 20 years of experience are not expert riders.....they just think they are. How many people can afford to wreck 20 bikes? Of that bunch, how many will still be alive?

I don't ever want to be an expert rider.......I just want to have fun. :D

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#2 Unread post by Ready2Ride » Wed Nov 07, 2007 6:25 pm

I agree whole heartedly, with starting out on a smaller bike. I did, after taking the course and rode it for a year. A woman sold me my first one, Yamaha Virago 535, which she and several other friends also learned on. I have since sold it to a sweet lady just getting into riding. It also took me that long to figure out what I wanted for my next bike, which is a Kawasaki Vulcan Classic 800. I am now contemplating a sport bike for a different feel, time will tell. P.S. I started riding at 50, and wish I had started sooner! :D
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Lady lion Bravo for your explaining bikes to big

#3 Unread post by WayneH600 » Sun Feb 17, 2008 11:44 am

I just found this forum and I'm really impressed, I wish I found it long ago. I've been riding for 8 years now and I don't care what people think about this size of my bike. I started out on a honda rebel and rode it for 2 years. I bought a Honda Shadow 600 and have been perfectly happy with it. My freinds sometines make fun of me in jest because they all ride 1100 and up. But I'm confortable on my 600. This year my wife decided to try and ride so I bought her a used rebel. Since I had to teach her and i wanted to hone my skills I bought Jerry Palladinos ride like a pro advanced cd(great cd). So while teaching the wife I bring cones for me. I'm having a blast working with her and getting better myself. .
. To many riders jump to quickly onto bikes that are to big bike to impress others. Thats a quick way to the hospital or mourge. I like you feel you must get started with something small and work on you skills prior to getting something to big, By the way. Used rebel $1200.00, plus new tire and inspection, I'm into it for $1500.00. I can use it for 2 years and easly get my money back, So if theres any begginers get a used bike, take off the mirrors and light and practice. Just think of how you would feel dropping your new $7500 bike. If you drop the used one, no harm done. thats what its for to learn. :P
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#4 Unread post by xci.ed6 » Sat Mar 15, 2008 8:13 pm

I started on a trail 70, and rode that for 4 years ;) Then moved on to a Ninja 250. They get put down alot because of their size, a little because of the looks (easy to fix, but no worries now, the new 250 makes me want another :drool:). Fact is they are great bikes. The super short gearing makes them quicker than most cars, even with only 28 horsepower. They even turn better than you can use legally on any public road. My uncle has been riding for 20+ years, and rides like 10,000mi per year and ended up with a Ninja 250 a couple years ago, turns out they are even great long distance bikes (he commuted 120 miles per day on it). You really can't beat the value, I bought mine for $1k, put on 2kmi and sold it for $1k. Insurance was $72 per YEAR.

I've ridden alot of the newer, faster machines. There is really no point to them. Absolutely terrifyingly fast, and brakes that make it feel like your eyes are being sucked out. So yeah I want one, but why buy something I can't use. I'll stick to my classics for now.

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#5 Unread post by Brackstone » Sun Mar 16, 2008 2:09 am

Great article.

Oh and what year was the GSXRCBRZXR manufactured? I don't believe I've seen that model! ;)
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#6 Unread post by Nibblet99 » Mon Mar 17, 2008 8:22 am

Brackstone wrote:Great article.

Oh and what year was the GSXRCBRZXR manufactured? I don't believe I've seen that model! ;)
Blast, I tried to find a pic of one, but google shows no images for kawayamahondazuki's
Starting out responsibly? - [url=http://www.totalmotorcycle.com/BBS/viewtopic.php?t=24730]Clicky[/url]
looking for a forum that advocates race replica, 600cc supersports for learners on public roads? - [url=http://www.google.com]Clicky[/url]

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#7 Unread post by Brackstone » Fri Apr 18, 2008 10:59 am

Nibblet99 wrote:kawayamahondazuki's
:roll2:
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#8 Unread post by Captain Pete » Mon May 19, 2008 7:41 am

Bravo; Bravissimo!!!!
Personally, I believe that in the US we should have a graduated system of motorcycle licensing. This is how it would work. First, you would have to pass a motorcycle safety course, no ands ifs or buts. Then, you could get licensed on something 125cc and under, and that would be good for one year. After one year, you would be required to take another driving test, and upon passing, you would be granted a license for a 250cc bike. The logic here is that a 250cc bike can actually be ridden on the highway, whereas most 125cc bikes cannot. After one year on a 250cc bike (by the way, you would be required to keep a mileage log, and ride at least 1000 miles in the second year to go to the next step), you could graduate to a bike as large as 600cc. After riding a 600cc for another year, then you could graduate to a high powered sport bike if you meet the following criteria; you have logged at least 10,000 miles of riding in the last three years, you have taken a motorcycle course specifically designed toward teaching people how to ride such bikes, and you have had no moving violations on your bike in the past two years. If you want to graduate to a big cruiser, then you would have to have logged the pre-requisite 10,000 miles, and take a refresher safety course.

And while we're at it, let's go ahead and require formal driver's training for getting a regular driver's license, too.

Along the same vein, I was passed yesterday on I-70 by a couple on what looked like a GSXR from the colors. Both the man and the woman, riding 2 up, were wearing sandals and no helmets (Kansas has no helmet laws), and absolutely no protective gear whatsoever. I won't dis sportbike owners, but is seems to me that sportbikes attract an inordinate amount of irresponsible riders, and on occasion even turn otherwise responsible riders into idiots (not that they are all idiots, just that it does happen). And the salesmen at dealerships do not do nearly enough to dissuade people buying a superbike as their first bike.
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#9 Unread post by jonnythan » Mon May 19, 2008 7:43 am

Captain Pete wrote:Bravo; Bravissimo!!!!
Personally, I believe that in the US we should have a graduated system of motorcycle licensing. This is how it would work. First, you would have to pass a motorcycle safety course, no ands ifs or buts. Then, you could get licensed on something 125cc and under, and that would be good for one year. After one year, you would be required to take another driving test, and upon passing, you would be granted a license for a 250cc bike. The logic here is that a 250cc bike can actually be ridden on the highway, whereas most 125cc bikes cannot. After one year on a 250cc bike (by the way, you would be required to keep a mileage log, and ride at least 1000 miles in the second year to go to the next step), you could graduate to a bike as large as 600cc. After riding a 600cc for another year, then you could graduate to a high powered sport bike if you meet the following criteria; you have logged at least 10,000 miles of riding in the last three years, you have taken a motorcycle course specifically designed toward teaching people how to ride such bikes, and you have had no moving violations on your bike in the past two years. If you want to graduate to a big cruiser, then you would have to have logged the pre-requisite 10,000 miles, and take a refresher safety course.

And while we're at it, let's go ahead and require formal driver's training for getting a regular driver's license, too.

Along the same vein, I was passed yesterday on I-70 by a couple on what looked like a GSXR from the colors. Both the man and the woman, riding 2 up, were wearing sandals and no helmets (Kansas has no helmet laws), and absolutely no protective gear whatsoever. I won't dis sportbike owners, but is seems to me that sportbikes attract an inordinate amount of irresponsible riders, and on occasion even turn otherwise responsible riders into idiots (not that they are all idiots, just that it does happen). And the salesmen at dealerships do not do nearly enough to dissuade people buying a superbike as their first bike.
Graduated licensing is one thing, but your scheme is just nuts.

Limiting everyone to 125cc for a year??

Seriously, 125cc?

And mileage logs? Four different "levels" of licensing?

Give me a break.
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#10 Unread post by ninja_nate » Mon May 19, 2008 8:20 am

Thanks, Lion_Lady, for the great info! I was actually considering a Kawasaki KLR650 for my first bike...I had heard a lot of neat things about it, including that it would make a good handling beginner bike. But after reading all your info, I'm going to reconsider that. I think I might go with a 250-400. I can always upgrade, right? 8)
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#11 Unread post by mazer » Tue Aug 05, 2008 10:50 pm

Thanks so much for sharing such valuable information, I will pass it on to anyone new to motorcycling and is taunted by those pretty sportbikes.

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#12 Unread post by KILLBILL » Sat Aug 09, 2008 1:55 pm

Great sticky - glad to be a part of a site that believes that
a 600 inline 4 is WAY too much for a new rider.

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#13 Unread post by Lion_Lady » Sun Aug 10, 2008 11:01 am

jonnythan wrote:
Captain Pete wrote:...Personally, I believe that in the US we should have a graduated system of motorcycle licensing. This is how it would work. First, you would have to pass a motorcycle safety course, no ands ifs or buts. Then, you could get licensed on something 125cc and under, and that would be good for one year. After one year, you would be required to take another driving test, and upon passing, you would be granted a license for a 250cc bike. The logic here is that a 250cc bike can actually be ridden on the highway, whereas most 125cc bikes cannot. After one year on a 250cc bike (by the way, you would be required to keep a mileage log, and ride at least 1000 miles in the second year to go to the next step), you could graduate to a bike as large as 600cc. After riding a 600cc for another year, then you could graduate to a high powered sport bike if you meet the following criteria; you have logged at least 10,000 miles of riding in the last three years, you have taken a motorcycle course specifically designed toward teaching people how to ride such bikes, and you have had no moving violations on your bike in the past two years. If you want to graduate to a big cruiser, then you would have to have logged the pre-requisite 10,000 miles, and take a refresher safety course.

And while we're at it, let's go ahead and require formal driver's training for getting a regular driver's license, too.
Graduated licensing is one thing, but your scheme is just nuts.
Limiting everyone to 125cc for a year??
Seriously, 125cc?
And mileage logs? Four different "levels" of licensing?
Give me a break.
Actually in Europe, graduated licensing is the standard for riding a motorcycle on the streets. The system works much like what CaptPete describes. They've been doing it that way for a looooong time. And folks take riding safely very seriously. You'll almost NEVER see a rider on the road without full gear.

Professional driver training is required before being licensed to drive a car, in many european countries, as well.

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#14 Unread post by ceemes » Sun Aug 10, 2008 2:13 pm

While I completely agree with Captain Pete re: Graduated Licensing, I think he is off the mark when it comes to limiting the amount of CC's each licensing level is permitted to run.

CC's should not be the qualifier, rather it should be HP. Consider the amount of HP a 600RR engine puts out compared to a 600 CC v-twin cruiser engine.

By limiting the amount of HP allowed to each license class, even a completely green newbie can own a 600 sport bike as their first bike, if its power is restricted through fuel flow restriction plates and monkeying around with various throttle controls. I am not sure, but I believe they already do this in the UK.
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New Riders... before you buy a 600+cc sportbike READ THIS!!!

#15 Unread post by BlackCowboy » Mon Nov 03, 2008 10:52 pm

I bought a Qlink 250 for my first bike and I love it. I am glad that I bought a 250 to train on any other size I would have been kind of scared to ride. Now I think it's time to upgrade to a 500 or 650.
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#16 Unread post by RC DAVE » Tue Feb 24, 2009 4:14 pm

OUTSTANDING INFO. I DIDNT BUY A LITRE BIKE TILL I WAS 40 THOSE LITTLE 600S GOT TO BE TO MUCH TO REV ALLTHE TIME AND EVEN THEN I BOUGHT A TWIN STILL QUICK BUT JUST NOT SO DAM BLISTERING FAST THE RC IS FAR FROM A SLUG BUT JUST GOOD USABLE POWER
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#17 Unread post by jasonn1970 » Sat Feb 28, 2009 3:55 pm

Hi all, great forum and importantly the words of wisdom form experience riders.
I live in Birmingham in the UK and passed my test last month at the ripe old age of 39. I have just bought a 1994 Kawasaki GPZ500S as my first bike and now im really learning how to ride a bike. Im not one for speed, so im happy to gain experience on my bike before even considering a bigger machine. I want to enjoy my riding experience and not have it whizz by so fast…..
I believe in learning to walk, before you run and that’s exactly what im doing.

Ride Safe, Be Safe….

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#18 Unread post by Wrider » Thu Apr 09, 2009 3:30 am

As for you saying 600s are too small and 1000s are more your size... Dude I'm bigger than you. I'm 6'2 300 lbs. I'm a bouncer and a certified bike mechanic to put my size/physicality into perspective for you.

As for starting off on a 250 or a 500 or whatever, yeah, I agree us big guys look kinda crazy on smaller bikes. But we do look better alive, I promise you that. Having ridden everything from a Rebel 250 to a Hayabusa I know the differences in handling, power, etc.

Honestly I know no-one that can/has used any bike othe than a cruiser to it's potential on the street.

As far as 1Ks vs 600s for long travel, you're looking at the wrong kind of bike for that. Plain and simple. Again coming from a guy who wants to make a Hayabusa into a hyper-sport touring bike.

The owner wouldn't let you sit on the bikes because he sees "squid" stamped on your forehead. For him he sees a kid trying to look cool. I can walk into any bike shop in my area and sit on any bike in there because the owners know I'm not just another kid trying to be a bad-oring.

As far as good beginner bikes... If you're insistent on getting a sportbike then I'd say go look at a Suzuki SV-650. Gray area beginner's bike, plenty of speed and torque, and has the plastics to make it look like you're a bad-oring on a repli-racer...

And before you discount me on the fact that I'm old and trying to discourage you based on my discrimination against kids, I'll let you know I'm 22, a certified bike mechanic, and a speed demon myself.
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#19 Unread post by Kal » Thu Apr 09, 2009 3:42 am

Wrider wrote: agree us big guys look kinda crazy on smaller bikes.
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Never get bored of posting CG125 pictures. Seat height 30.7 inches, weight: 251lbs. I am 6'4 and last time I checked 196lbs.

My GB250 is ever so slightly smaller and lighter physically, which is nice from a performance point of view. :twisted:

Thing is I saw a picture from the side of a friend on his 92 'Blade last night. The friend is 6 foot and although not slim is not horrifically overweight. He made the bike look like a toy, and so will you unless you are riding the silly sized cruisers.

I am inclinded to fall into line with wrider on the SV650 recomendation or even a Hyosung GT650R. It is a lot more forgiving than a full blooded supersports 600.

Insurance statistics state the MOST common serious incident (KSI) is a single vehicle collision, rider under 25 with only a couple of years experience, riding a Supersports bike.

We are looking at this to be your first motorcycle, not your last.
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#20 Unread post by Kal » Tue Apr 21, 2009 11:27 am

amysue529 wrote:I feel like i need to "look thru" the turn, but i was fixated on the road a few bike lengths ahead of me looking for loose gravel.
You just said two of the most critical things about cornering which are opposite ends of the same thing.

Target fiaxation tends to leads to 'incidents' - the way to beat target fixation is to look as far through the corner as possible - changing the bikes position in the road to increase your view.

Certainly early in your career the rule of thumb is that the bike goes where you look.
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