How to deal with gravel/sand/oil/dirt/accidental sliding

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Ninja Geoff
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How to deal with gravel/sand/oil/dirt/accidental sliding

#1 Unread post by Ninja Geoff » Tue Sep 02, 2008 8:27 pm

Well, you all know there's a lot of "poo poo" out there on the roads that can end your ride pretty fast. Between marble sized gravel next to a construction site (ugh), a dirt driveway right at the apex of one of your favorite turns, and oil found on the road form other vehicles (along with other stuff like trans fluid and anti-freeze), the road can be a pretty slick space. Not to mention just riding a little too fast in the rain. The front end can slide out, the rear can slide out, and if you're unllucky enough, both can go at the same time. There's two ways to handle these when they happen. One, is luck. The other way is experiance and skill. The MSF BRC touches on these subjects, but heaven help you if you're not in a parking lot when you encounter them (and even if you ARE in a parking lot).

There is a way to get used to the sensation of "OHMYGOD I HAVE NO CONTROL HOLY "poo poo" I'M GONNA CRASH". Ride a dirtbike. Ride it as much as you can. If you have no place to keep one, and don't know anyone who can lend you one, consider a small dual-sport. Something in the 200-250 range. They're perfect because they're cheap and they're not as good as a "real" dirtbike. You want the sub-race suspension, brakes, and chassis to start out on the dirst, much the same as the street. YOU learn to cope with the dangers and obsticals of trail riding, jumping dunes, and blazing a path through a trailess woods all on your own, insted of having some trick upside down forks with gold valves and adjustable everything. And when/if you do eventually get that hardcore dune jumping, MX winning dirtbike with better suspension than your average non-race rep sports bike, then you'll be all the better rider for it.

And, if all else fails and you don't know any one with a dirtbike, can't afford a dual sport, and have nowhere to keep a dirtbike of your own, the MSF offers a class. http://www.dirtbikeschool.com/ If there was one near me, I'd be taking it myself. But I'll have to stick to riding other peoples dirtbikes for now.
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JC Viper
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#2 Unread post by JC Viper » Tue Sep 02, 2008 10:23 pm

It's called the Piaggio MP3, the more reviews I read about it the more it seems to be the perfect solution to motorcycling with less worry.

I guess a good solution is to look far ahead into your turns and plan accordingly. anticipate the worst so you can think about any action you need to take.

My rear tire had some slipping while crossing a steel covered railroad crossing in the rain. I didn't make any abrupt movements or changes in bike operation so the bike regained traction on its own. Any throttle changes or attempts to keep it straight might have made things nasty.
One thing you can count on: You push a man too far, and sooner or later he'll start pushing back.

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#3 Unread post by flw » Thu Sep 04, 2008 1:24 pm

I agree with the dirt bike concept so that you always are comfortable with how to properly slide through turns rather than panic and just wipe out. Many people forget as time goes by and when they need it in a instant, its a skill that is lost.

Short of that is to ride conservatively. Ride to live another day.
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#4 Unread post by TexasPhotographer » Fri Sep 05, 2008 2:20 pm

I am kinda new to riding. I rode a dirt bike 30 some years ago, but git my first road bike just in March.

Had a fall in June broke 5 bones and my dealer also a good friend suggested he lend me a dirt bike and give me a few lessons free. I will take him up on that as having some dirt bike experience will help you ride cruisers on gravel and slushy roads. Just my $.02
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#5 Unread post by SBK15 » Sun Sep 07, 2008 2:42 pm

When I first got my DR650 i would take on gravel roads and would slide all over the place, but the more i road the faster i would go. And now i dont worry about sand and gravel, on my other bike I almost couldn't go over gravel or sand, etc etc without the back end sliding out, but now i guess im use to sliding around and can expect what will happen. Your right Geoff, riding a Dual Sport and getting use to the sliding around really helps!
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#6 Unread post by Thumper » Sun Sep 07, 2008 11:28 pm

JC Viper wrote:It's called the Piaggio MP3, the more reviews I read about it the more it seems to be the perfect solution to motorcycling with less worry.
It is definitely tons of fun...but I still worry about washing out on stuff like gravel on mine. It's more stable for sure, but that back wheel is all by itself, and you *can* dump the scooter. I think. I'm trying not to...

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#7 Unread post by JC Viper » Mon Sep 08, 2008 12:03 pm

This guy who does testing for companies like Piaggio told me all about his MP3. He rode in the winter with some ice here and there and also some road salt. He told me on a regular bike you would be eating sh*t, but with the MP3 you would slide a bit but end up laughing afterwards. After hearing it I began wanting one for harsh weather conditions.

Last I heard he was in Italy testing something.
One thing you can count on: You push a man too far, and sooner or later he'll start pushing back.

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