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#521 Unread post by Johnj » Sat Mar 15, 2008 4:59 pm

sv-wolf wrote:he truth is, I never know how to answer this question. In a historical sense ‘yes’ is a perfectly accurate answer. But saying it does nothing more than reinforce an ignorant prejudice, and conveys nothing about how I or others like me think. Most people who ask the question don’t care what you believe: they are just up for a hate-argument. Some are interested, but have a very cloudy idea of what they are talking about. And to be fair, why should they? No-one ever understood this area of thought by reading a newspaper or going to school. Academic courses on the subject fill student’s heads with a lot of commentary but few facts. (Never believe that academics are not as full of "crumb" as everyone else.)

It goes like this: if I say, ‘yes’, someone will either try to recruit my support for some god-awful Trotskyist or Soviet-style political ideology, or he will look at me as though I had just stepped in a very large pile of horse dodo. Political discussion at this level is generally a waste of breath. For guys like this it’s tribal. Political language is nothing more to them than a set of identity symbols - “I’ll tell you what, mate: I’m a ‘This’ and you’re a ‘THAT’.” To start any kind of conversation on these terms is to enter the whirlwind, where shreds of ego and fear go flying about in all directions.

So...are you a commie? :laughing:
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#522 Unread post by sv-wolf » Sat Mar 15, 2008 7:02 pm

God only knows! :laughing:

(How long have you got?)

Sod it John, now you've piqued me to a reply. This will be the shortest answer I have ever given to this question. If by 'commie' you mean anything that is usually or commonly meant by it, for example, a supporter of a totalitarian centralised state, or a Trotskyist-inspired political ideology, or an Asian, South-East Asian or South American peasant movement, or an organised party that goes by that name, then most definitely not.

If by 'commie, you mean someone who believes that capitalism is exploitative and the most violent, wasteful and destructive system ever evolved and that if the human race is to survive, it will be absolutely necessary to replace it with an economic system of communal ownership under democratic control - and the sooner the better - then yes, most definitely, that's me.

Hmm! seven lines - pretty good going for me, I think!
Last edited by sv-wolf on Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#523 Unread post by dr_bar » Sun Mar 16, 2008 3:39 am

I was expecting a doctoral dissertation... :laughing:
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#524 Unread post by sv-wolf » Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:24 am

:oops: :oops: :oops:

Don't push me, Doc...!

My better judgement is sometimes paper thin!

:lol:
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#525 Unread post by noodlenoggin » Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:03 am

Yeah, don't get Richard started on THIS one! :starwars: :laughing:
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#526 Unread post by Johnj » Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:46 am

Good answer. You sound more like a Social Democrat to me.
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#527 Unread post by sv-wolf » Sun Mar 16, 2008 2:01 pm

noodlenoggin wrote:Yeah, don't get Richard started on THIS one! :starwars: :laughing:
Bloody hell, noodle, can't a bloke get any elbow room around here. :D

Johnj wrote:Good answer. You sound more like a Social Democrat to me.
Whaaaaaaat! Pistols at dawn, John! :archery: :catapult:

Not on your life! Back in the nineteenth-century, the Social Democratic parties went down the route of trying to reform capitalism and lost their way. The organisation I got my first political education from took its stand in 1904 on revolutionary opposition to capitalism precisely to avoid making the same mistake.

And now for a little tub thumping: Capitalism can't be reformed, it can only be ended. It will end - no economic system lasts for ever - but whether it can be ended before it blows us sky high or roasts our delicate arse I can't tell. (On a bad day, I doubt it.) But neither can I see any other choice except to try. Even when I feel thoroughly disillusioned at the small amount of progress made over the last hundred years, the violence and destructiveness of this bloody awful system is too horrific to do anything other than maintain a critical opposition to it.

How many lines is that? I need to practice brevity. :D
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#528 Unread post by roscowgo » Mon Mar 17, 2008 3:20 pm

sv-wolf wrote:
roscowgo wrote:Heya SV. sorry to hear bout the 'tona.

Really is unreasonable for a new bike to act that way.

Kinda makes me wanna stay away from the triumph line. Even if they do make me drool like sally struthers at the wonka chocolate factory.
Cheers rosco

But I wouldn't like for my experiences to put you off a Triumph if you were really minded to go for one. They're great bikes. I know at least two dozen people who own them and who have never had a moment's trouble with them. I think I've just been very unlucky with mine. Triumph build to very fine tolerances, generally, but it doesn't matter who the manufacturer is, every so often something goes wrong and they turn out a lemon.

If it has 2 wheels, Then I am madly passionately in love with it, even the ones that don't appeal to me at all. I'll have one one day. The T100's or a scrambler.

Someone hand me my bib. I feel a drool coming on.

*edit. Der. completely forgot the real reason I posted. I hope they fix you up at the dealership. Maybe the new one will be even brighter yellow. :D

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#529 Unread post by sv-wolf » Tue Mar 18, 2008 4:44 am

roscowgo wrote: If it has 2 wheels, Then I am madly passionately in love with it, even the ones that don't appeal to me at all. I'll have one one day. The T100's or a scrambler.

Someone hand me my bib. I feel a drool coming on.
:D
I know how you feel Rosco, mate. It's just that at the moment I feel like I'm in the middle of a lover's tiff - a pretty major one that at one point threatened to break us up for good!
Last edited by sv-wolf on Wed Mar 19, 2008 2:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#530 Unread post by Pittance » Tue Mar 18, 2008 8:50 am

Even when I feel thoroughly disillusioned at the small amount of progress made over the last hundred years, the violence and destructiveness of this bloody awful system is too horrific to do anything other than maintain a critical opposition to it.
Ever since humanity has thrown off the shackles of an oppresive religious government (middle ages-ish), technological progress has done nothing but increased exponentially. So I don't quite understand what you mean.

Also, until the human psyche evolves past the selfish mindset of survival, true altruism will never exist. Everyone does everything for a reason that benefits them. Even the most altruistic have helped others because of god (guilt or promise of paradise), or because it makes them feel like they are a good person. The only way to promote a communal for-the-good approach to the world is to tap people's selfish desire to survive (i.e. work together for common good). But most people are far too selfish or ignorant to really see the merits of this system. It's a strange thought, but humans, nay, all life on earth, is quite evil and self-serving. :twisted:

Don't mean to hijack your blog, just figured since you were already on the topic. Anyways, without captialism and the drive to make money (or fame), we wouldn't have such fast advances in motorcycle technology (competition). Therefore, it can't be all bad. :D

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#531 Unread post by sv-wolf » Tue Mar 18, 2008 4:21 pm

Pittance wrote:
Ever since humanity has thrown off the shackles of an oppresive religious government (middle ages-ish), technological progress has done nothing but increased exponentially. So I don't quite understand what you mean.

Also, until the human psyche evolves past the selfish mindset of survival, true altruism will never exist. Everyone does everything for a reason that benefits them. Even the most altruistic have helped others because of god (guilt or promise of paradise), or because it makes them feel like they are a good person. The only way to promote a communal for-the-good approach to the world is to tap people's selfish desire to survive (i.e. work together for common good). But most people are far too selfish or ignorant to really see the merits of this system. It's a strange thought, but humans, nay, all life on earth, is quite evil and self-serving. :twisted:

Don't mean to hijack your blog, just figured since you were already on the topic. Anyways, without captialism and the drive to make money (or fame), we wouldn't have such fast advances in motorcycle technology (competition). Therefore, it can't be all bad. :D
Hi Pittance

Thanks for picking this up. I try not to express my political opinions too much here. I save them for other forums. Here I just like being a biker and talking to other bikers. But sometimes I get the bit between my teeth and I go sounding off. :boxing:

I'll respond briefly (if that is possible.) :D

Sorry, I wasn't very clear. When I said, 'lack of progress', I was referring to the lack of progress made by the socialist movement over the last century. Technological progress, as you say, has been enormous (though I wouldn't say exponential - since the regular crises inherent in the capitalist economy keep putting a brake on it.)

Over the last hundred years we have had many intellectual movements that have tried to demonstrate that 'human nature' is selfish, or that selfish behaviour is the result of our evolutionary or genetic inheritance: Socal Darwinism, the pop ethologists of the 1960s, sociobiology and now evolutionary psychology. These are just the main ones. None of these movements had a sound scientific basis. Even evolutionary psychology, which has a kind of academic respectablity, is forced, when pushed, to admit that its conclusions are mere conjecture for which no evidence whatsoever is available.

The simple fact is that no-one has ever been able to discover genes that determine complex human behaviour.

In evolutionary terms human beings share 98.4 percent of their genes with their nearest relatives - chimpanzees and bonobos. But from the moment that chimps and human beings started to go their separate evolutionary ways, that tiny 1.6 percent separation made an enormous difference to us. Human beings evolved into a species with an much larger and more complex brain, and a much more intricate nervous system. At the same time they developed a highly sophisticated vocal apparatus. There was also an extraordinary and unprecedented extention of the childhood phase of their life cycle. All this has selected them to adapt and learn through culture instead of having fixed behavioural responses.

Throughout our uniquely long period of childhood we remain dependent on our parents or other adults, but during all that time we are modelling ourselves on them and learning our behaviour from them and from the rest of our social environment. We learn through direct experience, through our capacity for abstract thought and through our ability to communicate with each other.

The 'selfish' behaviour you identify around you is not something 'natural' to us or fixed in our genes, it is a learned behaviour derived from the society in which we are brought up. For the last three thousand years we have lived in a series of societies based on varying forms of ownership. But they all had one thing in common: they divided us economically from one another by private property institutions. (Before that time it was very different.) For the last four hundred years or so we have lived in the latest of these: capitalism. Capitalism is highly successful form of society but it is also highly unstable and totally ruthless in its pursuit of profit.

Capitalism like previous societies divides human beings into isolated economic units, but the divisions are much more marked than before. Being isolated in this way, we are forced into competition with one another. We are compelled by private property institutions, not by our nature, to behave selfishly. Capitalism is itself the cause of 'selfish' or more correctly self-interested human behaviour.

In the course of history human beings have lived in many different kinds of social and economic environment, and as a result have displayed many different kinds of behaviour, some of which is 'self-interested' but a great deal of it isn't.

Think about this term 'human nature' for a moment. It appears to be fairly neutral, but that's an illusion. It is a highly charged piece of political propaganda. If I were to speak to you of wars or robbing or mugging, you might say to me: 'Well that's human nature for you.' That sort of response is familiar to all of us. People say it all the time. It is designed to make us think, well there's nothing you can do about it, we're all thoroughly bad (except me of course!)

But let me put to you that there are many, many, recorded cases in war or in times of adversity of people spontaneously sacrificing themselves for others. How do you explain the soldier who throws himself on a bomb to save those around him? (I remember a case from the Northern Ireland conflict some years ago). There is only one explanation that makes sense. His behaviour is the result of a sudden, unpremeditated act of empathy. Empathic identification with the suffering of others is very common among human beings. It happens between partners, between parents and children, between friends, between strangers. The propaganda model of capitalism tries to hush it up, because it is an inconvenient belief to the capitalist. He likes people to think that the competition inherent in the capitalist system is somehow 'natural' or based on 'human nature'.

But, the fact is, genuine altruism is a common experience.

:cheers:

The soldier doesn't throw himself on the bomb because he thinks it is going to make him feel like a good person, for the simple reason that in a few seconds he is not going to be a person at all and he may not have a belief in a god either. A serious belief in god is not widespread in the UK.

When my wife became seriously ill three years ago, the kindness and self-sacrifice shown by people in my local community was overwhelming. People like helping each other because, through empathy, they experience each other's suffering and they also experience each other's relief. They experience it as their own. We are a social animal. We have that capacity. We co-operate.

If altruistic or supererogative (self-sacrificing) behaviour is purely self-directed, why do our our parents sacrifce years of their lives bringing us up? Is that something to do with a belief in god? Is it guilt? I don't think so. Guilt is interesting BTW. We are born with a capacity for certain emotions, but guilt, like disgust is not one of them. Guilt and disgust are entirely learned feelings, and like our complex behaviours, they come from our social environment. Members of some East Asian cultures, have no experience of guilt at all. Do parents in these cultures neglect or abandon their children as a result because they don't feel enough guilt to want to look after them? Actually, no!

Empathy and altruism are perfectly common among human beings, but we don't see them or admit to their existence. We are taught not to. We argue them away. If I were to reel of a list of acts of kindness or sacrifice to you that I have experienced in the course of my life, would you beam and smile and say, 'Ah well, that's human nature for you'? No you wouldn't. People don't use the term 'human nature' in this way. It is used only to assert that 'human nature' is naturally selfish. It's not a neutral term. It's a piece of propaganda.

I suggest you don't let the social brainwashing about human nature being 'selfish' overwhelm your eyes. Look around. People perform acts of kindness, support and sacrifice every day. And they do this despite the enormous pressures that capitalism places on them to do the opposite - to 'look out for number one'.

We choose our attitudes, or rather, we are indoctrinated into our attitudes by our society, because in our society the class that lives by the exploitation of others needs to be able to justify the system that provides them with so much for so little. Educating people into the belief that human beings are naturally selfish or violent is a good way to justify exploitation, war and all kinds of inhuman practices to them. (Notice of course it is only corporations, the military and the state that are allowed to justify their actions like this - not you or I.)

We are indoctrinated into our attitudes. It's cool to by cynical about 'human nature' not cool to think that there might be something co-operative and social and very powerful about human beings. I hear that cynicism in people's voices every day. I've heard it an endless number of times on this site. And it is always stated in more or less exactly the same terms using the same sort of language. People are just mouthing what their society teaches them to believe. That's an uncomfortable thought, but if you keep your ears open you'll prove it to yourself over and over again in all sorts of ways. We are a learning animal, we learn to believe what we are taught to belive.

But for all that, the standard ways we try to deny reality don't add up to a real argument or explanation, they are just part of a settled social attitude - a way of saying 'Blahhh!' to what we are as human beings, rather than celebrating what is valuable in us. I hear it in your post when you say:

"Even the most altruistic have helped others because of god (guilt or promise of paradise), or because it makes them feel like they are a good person.as out to get something for themselves."

I don't buy that. It's only an attitude, not evidence of how people really are.

Oh Hell! And I said I was going to be brief! Failed again. :frusty:
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#532 Unread post by blues2cruise » Wed Mar 19, 2008 2:06 am

Perhaps a change of topic would help. Politicians are always squabbling....when they are noy busy lying to us.

Perhaps we could discuss environmental practices in Britian. Very inovative. Have a loo at this short video from Britian. lthough it is quite funny, they do make a point. :) enjoy. :)

http://youtube.com/watch?v=rg9ZXBpzalw
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#533 Unread post by Pittance » Wed Mar 19, 2008 6:59 am

That was a very well-spoken and intelligent argument. :) While I still do not entirely agree with your views on humanity, I do agree with you about always keeping an open mind and always question what you hear. That is one of my only real core beliefs. Also I agree that this is a biker forum, and politics are always tricky to discuss. But hey, it's your blog, you can discuss whatever you feel like :P If you do enjoy speaking about this subject, I think it'd be a great topic for Soap Box or where ever else. Its always exciting and refreshing finding people with different views who can speak/debate a subject intelligently. Especially on the internet.

Speaking of what Blues said: I read an article recently about how the diesel BMW 520d gets better gas mileage than the toyota prius, yet it still has to pay full congestion charges in most cities while the little ugly prius gets off scott free. :roll:
Oh, and there are 2 new hydrogen fuel cell cars now in open market testing. Honda and Chevy. Never thought I'd see the day. I've been waiting for gaseous car for a long time. :D

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#534 Unread post by sv-wolf » Wed Mar 19, 2008 7:27 am

Loved the video, blues! Thanks for that.

I guess my view on the subject of politics is very simple.

Politics is far to important to be left to the politicians.

We can get tribal about this and squabble pointlessly or we can have an interesting exchange of views. The choice is ours.

Bikes are the subject, but bikers are not totally single-minded in their worldview - many of them anyway. :humm: I'm always interested in this view that we should steer clear of politics on the grounds that it is controversial and it ends up in squabbles. I think that, in itself, is a point of view that is promoted by our society. It's very convenient. It means that one of the most important aspects of our lives is placed off limits to discussion. The result of not discussing these matters is inaction and passive acceptance of whatever agenda these squabbling politicians want to set for us. It goes along with the general belief that because they wear business suits and go to church on Sunday they are pretty benign and we can trust them. OK they make mistakes occasionally. Occasionally they are corrupt. But on the whole they are interested in furthering our interests. To which the simple, exasperated answer must always be; Bullsh1t!

The thought that my life and the lives of my family and friends are in the hands of these guys is one of the scariest thoughts that ever goes through my head.

However. Last night I got details of my flight out to India in September

:motorcycle:

Waaaaaaaayyy! Suddenly it is real.


:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

:grouphug2:
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#535 Unread post by blues2cruise » Wed Mar 19, 2008 10:15 am

sv-wolf wrote:Loved the video, blues! Thanks for that.
'welcome.

It goes along with the general belief that because they wear business suits and go to church on Sunday they are pretty benign and we can trust them. OK they make mistakes occasionally. Occasionally they are corrupt. But on the whole they are interested in furthering our interests. To which the simple, exasperated answer must always be; Bullsh1t!

Just because someone wears a suit....and usually a very expensive one custom tailered.....well take a look at Conrad Black....jail.

Look how many priests and ministers get caught doing dirty deeds. (should have left the dirty deeds to ACDC.... :wink: ,)

Take a look at Canada's top dog....he has zero interest in me or my neighbours.....neither does BC's top dog....his only interest in how much money can he get from selling off yet another piece of British Columbia.

Politicians are self serving for the most part. There are a few who work hard for the little people, but by and large it's all about power and control.


:motorcycle:

Waaaaaaaayyy! Suddenly it is real.


:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

:grouphug2:
:bliss: :spot: :multistars:




ok...me and my three day headache will get off my soapbox now and leave you in peace.....are you packed yet? :)
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#536 Unread post by sv-wolf » Sun Mar 23, 2008 10:38 am

Right!

About the Daytona…!

:oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops:

Weeeeeeeeeeeeell! Oh dear! I guess I’m too embarrassed to come straight out and tell the truth here. If I'm going to get anywhere close, I’m gonna have to sneak up on it from behind.

I took the morning off work last Thursday week, rang my insurance company, and got the Daytona lifted to ‘On Yer Triumph’, the dealers over in Aston Clinton. The insurers sent a different rescue company this time. They turned up very efficiently within the hour, not with two enormous flatbeds like the last outfit but, more sensibly, with a bike-sized van. This company was a specialist bike rescue service – one of only a couple operating in the country. I guess that says quite a lot about how few bikers there are now in Britain - relatively speaking. The guy driving the van was a hoot. He was a biker himself, another R1 fanatic. He was about thirty and so plugged into life that his eyes lit up and his voice crackled with electricity every time he opened his mouth. He was one of the most interesting guys I've met in ages.

As we tied the bike down in the back of his van, we spoke about adventure holidaying. He told me his wife had been away from home for several weeks, bicycling in India. “She’s really into life-changing experiences,” he said. “She does this kind of thing all the time. Me: I’m into life-threatening experiences,” he added, and went all misty-eyed for a moment.

It was worth having the bike taken away just to get ten minutes conversation with him. Though he did make one remark which gave me an uncomfortable moment. “Hmmmm!” he said, as he looked over the bike, “another Triumph! I’ve been picking them up all winter.” Maybe he saw the look on my face, but he suddenly laughed and said, “Nah! It’s mostly classic Triumphs. They tend to be owned by older guys who want to ride all year round. There’s just a lot more of them out there at the moment.”

I knew the dealers weren't able to look at the bike straight away. I also suspected that once they had looked at it and pronounced on its condition, I was going to have a fight with Triumph on my hands. As I said earlier, that wasn't something I was looking forward to. So, one way or another I wasn't in too much of a hurry to get their verdict. I gave them a week.

When Thursday dawned, a week later and I still hadn't heard from them, I swallowed hard and picked up the phone. I had no idea what they were going to say.

What they did say took me totally by surprise.

“Well,” said Bruce, thoughtfully, after I'd asked the question, “We had a good look at it and couldn’t find anything wrong.”

“Whaaaat!!!!” My mind shot back to that moment on Higbury Hill two weeks ago: I could hear the awful clatter of the engine, and see the smoke pouring out the end of the can. “Nothing wrong?” I said. Total disbelief took over!
“Nope,” he said. “We checked it over thoroughly. There’s no smoke.”
“There was. Clouds of it”
“What colour was the smoke.”
“White-grey.”
“Could you have mistaken it for condensation? You know… these misty mornings…”
“No. No way! And what about all the oil she has been devouring?” I said.
There was a pause.
“Tell me your procedure for checking the oil.”
I took a deep breath then went through everything I did in detail. You know how it is: even though I stick rigidly to the instructions in the manual the mere fact of his asking the question made me start to doubt myself.
“OK, fair enough,” he said, when I’d finished. “We’ll have another look at it over the weekend.”

He rang back yesterday at close to half past five.
“Hi. What did you find?” I asked anxiously.
“Absolutely nothing. No smoke, no clatter.”
I couldn’t believe it.
“Well we did find on thing,” he said slowly.
I waited.
“The engine’d been over-filled with oil - more than a litre too much. Might have had something to do with the smoke you saw.
It was then that I started to feel just a little bit red in the face.
“But…”

But… But… But… But… But… But… But… But… But… But… But… But…

But how could that have happened? I'd been through the procedure for checking the oil just like I had done dozens of time before. I followed all the pointers in the log book: cold engine; upright bike; on a level surface…” (Definitely a level surface: I always check the oil with the bike standing on the patch of concrete outside my back door. The concrete had been laid absolutely dead flat in all directions to make sure that Di’s wheelchair wouldn’t roll on it. It was so flat you could use it as an international measure of flatness!!!!!)
“…and I checked the oil level several times on each occasion.” I blurted.

But I couldn’t deny, it did all fit together - almost. If I’d misread the oil level and over-filled the engine in compensation then maybe that did account for the smoke. But I'd checked the oil level six times (three times on each of two occasions). How could I have made such an error, not once, but over and again with such consistency? And such a big error! - How could I have seen the oil so low on the dipstick when the engine was, in fact, overfull by over a litre?

And there is one fruther thing this explanation doesn’t explain at all: the change in the engine tone. I’m not talking about the clatter I heard on the hill last week. There had been a sudden and definite change in the engine note a couple of weeks ago as I rode home from work. It was quite unmistakable! It was that change that made me check the oil levels in the first place.

But... but... but... but, if they are right, there is a good side to this. It would be really nice just to be able to get back on a bike again and not have to worry about the electrics cutting out or the engine seizing or the engine bolts shaking loose. And I guess I can handle having egg on my face if it means I’ve got a sound bike after all. When I told Ron about the oil he was very understanding: when I tell the guys at the bike club, I guess I'm going to be the subject of conversation for... oh, maybe several months! Possibly years!

I’ve run out of annual leave at work until the first of April so I’m not going to be able to pick the bike up till next Saturday. I'm going to Manchester that morning. I can catch a bus over to Aston and pick the bike up on the way. I agreed a plan with the dealers. They will mark the dipstick. I'll run the bike for 500 miles and then take it back to them and let them check again. I can take it back the following week as I hope to be riding out that way, anyway.

:roll:

So! Time to move on rapidly. I suppose having somehow managed to ‘out’ myself as your friendly neighbourhood ‘commie’ (still not sure how I did that) I guess I ought to live up to my new role and harangue everyone with a political diatribe or something. But all I can really think about, at this moment, is the weather. After a mild spring-like January and February, March has run into hailstones and snow. This weekend is Easter Bank Holiday weekend. I have four whole days to kill and, so far, I haven’t felt like going out once. The world is in a sorry state, I think.
Last edited by sv-wolf on Sun Mar 23, 2008 8:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Hud

“Man has no right to kill his brother. It is no excuse that he does so in uniform: he only adds the infamy of servitude to the crime of murder.”
Percy Bysshe Shelley

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jstark47
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#537 Unread post by jstark47 » Sun Mar 23, 2008 12:52 pm

I googled a bit, but couldn't get a clear read on whether 955i engines have dipsticks or sight glasses or both. You mentioned a dipstick. If it also has a sight glass, I would check the oil with that - more reliable than a dipstick, I think. If the oil's over the top of the sight glass when cold and level, certainly don't add any more.

As for the clatter, who knows? Our Trophy sounds like a old diesel Mercedes - all healthy Trophy 1200's do - but that's a different engine.
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#538 Unread post by fireguzzi » Sun Mar 23, 2008 1:13 pm

My instructors Trophy 900 was the same way. Us students used to make fun of him when he pulled up on it. We would tell him we thought the garbage truck was pulling up to empty the dumpsters.

His had about a half a billion miles on it though.
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#539 Unread post by sv-wolf » Sun Mar 23, 2008 3:27 pm

jstark47 wrote:I googled a bit, but couldn't get a clear read on whether 955i engines have dipsticks or sight glasses or both. You mentioned a dipstick. If it also has a sight glass, I would check the oil with that - more reliable than a dipstick, I think. If the oil's over the top of the sight glass when cold and level, certainly don't add any more.

As for the clatter, who knows? Our Trophy sounds like a old diesel Mercedes - all healthy Trophy 1200's do - but that's a different engine.
fireguzzi wrote:My instructors Trophy 900 was the same way. Us students used to make fun of him when he pulled up on it. We would tell him we thought the garbage truck was pulling up to empty the dumpsters.

His had about a half a billion miles on it though.
Hi guys

Yep, I know several riders who have Trophys. The engine sound? Well it's something between a rattle and an extremely annoying whine I would say.
:D

No JS, no sight glass at all, unfortunately. I find sight glasses far easier to deal with. There's just a dipstick. The Daytona comes with no centre stand and the most irritating single-sided paddock-stand set up that it is possible to imagine. It is impossible to use the paddock stand unless you have someone to help you or you are built like Swartzenegger and have nerves of steel. You can't get any leverage on it at all.

So to test the oil I have to crouch by the side of the bike, heave it upright, and then screw down and screw up the dipstick - all the while holding up the bike with my other hand and guessing as best I can how upright it is. It's about the most awkward and scary combination of actions you can imagine.

The thing about the change in engine tone was that it was just that - a change, a sudden, unmistakable change while I was riding home. One minute she was purring sweetly as she usually does, the next there was this definite rattle (Well OK, I admit, 'purring sweetly' is an exaggeration; no Triumph ever did that. But you know what I mean.)

Who knows? I give up for now. I'm not going to think about it till I pick her up at the end of next week.

:roll:
Hud

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#540 Unread post by sv-wolf » Mon Mar 24, 2008 6:20 pm

The Easter bank holiday weekend has been one big, lazy hiatus: a giant, furry hole in my overcooked life. It has been (let me count) four days of total, laid-back, self-indugent bliss! Mmmmm!

Spending the mornings reading in bed and getting up at two o'clock in the afternoon suits me very nicely - it's a lifestyle I could really get used to.

For four whole days, there have been no anxieties, no jobs around the house, no effort, no stress, no guilt... hmmm, and no bikes!

There has been a little bit of yearning.

Each day, I'm yearning just a bit more. I'm yearning to run off to Aston Clinton to repatriate my Daytona. Suddenly, I need to see her standing outside my back door again all bright and beautiful. I need to hear her ever-so-slightly agricultural roar each morning on my way to work.

So, sorry I started to feel negative about you, bike, when you coughed up clouds of smoke. Mea culpa, I guess. Yeah, I know, I even began to think of selling you and buying another machine. Can you forgive me?

Hey listen, y'know something? - it was the spring equinox last weekend and the big ol' world is tilting us back towards the sun; the clocks will be going forward soon; it'll be British Summer Time again. The evenings will be longer, the days will be warmer, the roads will be clearer. You and I could go for lots of long rides together. How 'bout it, huh?

I know! I'll take some annual leave. We'll go away together. Find a hotel. Just the two of us. Whaddya say?


No, can't wait another week. Somehow, I'll have to find a way of getting her home sooner. If I take time off work, I'd have to put in some extra long hours in the evenings to make up for it. But what the hell! It'll be a small price to pay!

But that reminds me (damn!): it's work again tomorrow! :blackcloud:

Work! Ugly thought. Uglier reality. If it weren't for all the laughs I have with colleagues, I'd go spare.

I've never been touched with the protestant work ethic. Not a bit! Work is there to pay the bills. Work is there so that you can eke out your days meaninglessly while you dream of higher things - like doing... well, like doing a course in cell biology, f'rinstance - my latest whim. I tell you, this stuff is mind-blowing (:bliss: ) or going for a long, Mediterranean ride: mountain hairpins and long lazy coastlines come to mind.

I have this question: why do they make government office spaces so boring? Why is the landscape of work so bare, the language so bland and the tasks so anodyne? There are a million-and-one more interesting and useful things to do with a life. And right now I need 'interesting'. I need 'furry'.

(You can tell it is the end of a holiday period, can't you?)

Furry is damn well what I need. I don't need government reports, I don't need an endless stream of boxes that need to be ticked, and I don't need patriotic gestures. I most certainly do not need to pretend.

Here in the UK we are not at all patriotic BTW. We only fly the national flag at football matches and then only to indicate our allegience to the national football team. We are so unpatriotic it has taken a recent individual Act of Parliament to force government bodies to fly the flag over their buildings. That means the damn thing will be fluttering over my workplace in the icy breeze when I arrive at work tomorrow morning. Another depressing thought. Makes me feel kinda yucky somehow.

So here's to the summer. Here's to the May Day bank holiday. Here's to a life of sheer sybaritic bliss.

(Some hope!)

You never know, though, I might get an extra specially good ride in to work tomorrow on the SV.
Hud

“Man has no right to kill his brother. It is no excuse that he does so in uniform: he only adds the infamy of servitude to the crime of murder.”
Percy Bysshe Shelley

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