LADIES: Do you live for twisties or struggle with them?

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blues2cruise
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#41 Unread post by blues2cruise » Sun Oct 05, 2008 8:13 am

RocketGirl wrote:
ladyreb wrote:Here's a Tennessee twistie from the infamous Deals Gap...

Image

Talk about fun! :D
OMG! So that's a twisty; I'm definitely not ready for that. :shock:

So from what I've read here so far the skills needed are: counter steering, picking your line, and setting up for the curve. I'm thinking if I practice and become more proficient and comfortable with U-turns and figure-8's that this might help me to tackle a true twisty? I'm not sure I'll be able to find a twistie in Delaware.
Helpful hint.....brake, slow down and downshift prior to the curve.....go as slow as you need to....maybe even second gear......eventually you will get better at it......
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#42 Unread post by shalihe74 » Sun Oct 05, 2008 8:28 pm

RocketGirl wrote:
ladyreb wrote:Here's a Tennessee twistie from the infamous Deals Gap...

Image

Talk about fun! :D
OMG! So that's a twisty; I'm definitely not ready for that. :shock:

So from what I've read here so far the skills needed are: counter steering, picking your line, and setting up for the curve. I'm thinking if I practice and become more proficient and comfortable with U-turns and figure-8's that this might help me to tackle a true twisty? I'm not sure I'll be able to find a twistie in Delaware.
Those skills - plus turning your head - are what is necessary to navigate a curve. However, doing U-turns and figure 8s (which are normally slow-speed maneuvers) won't really help much.

You need to get your speed above ~8 mph (shoot for 12 to 18) to get the bike to counter-steer. The way I would practice cornering would be to find a large parking lot with a couple of islands/trees/lights/etc. in it (or find large empty lot and use cones as obstacles.) Get the bike moving at about 15mph and then navigate around the obstacles as though you were driving on a road and the road curved around them (i.e. don't aim right for the light, imagine that the road curves around it and you're following the road - or use cones to mark out a 'road' around the obstacle).

Start with a wide curve around the obstacle, making sure that you slow (using both brakes) before entering your curve, look through the curve by turning your head, press the handlebar in the direction you want to travel, and then roll on the throttle just enough to keep the bike from decelerating as you lean.

Also remember to use an 'outside-inside-outside' path of travel through the corner. This straightens out the curve, as well as allows you to see more of the road as you turn your head.

As you get comfortable with the techniques involved, and can navigate your imaginary curve smoothly (i.e. you find you're picking up the speed a bit, and that you're not jerking around the corner, rolling off the throttle, going for the brake [very very bad], etc.), then make the curve a little sharper and keep practicing.

Also, if you took an MSF course, you can get in touch with your RiderCoaches and ask them how to set up the range for the following exercises: Cornering, Cornering Judgment and Negotiating Curves. These will allow you to practice your twisty techniques.

Hope this kind of helps.
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#43 Unread post by Lion_Lady » Mon Oct 13, 2008 4:09 pm

This past weekend, I FINALLY figured out twisties!!!

All these years I thought I WAS "looking through the turn."

Tight curves produced white knuckle tension. But I kept riding them, thinking I was doing it right, I just needed more practice. It was after goodies post about "not looking through the turns" that I really got to thinking. And I started to analize where my eyes really are as I ride corners. . . it seems my eyes were generally only about 3-4 bike lengths ahead of me. No wonder I found twisties such a struggle.

Huh! If I look waaaay around a curve, it helps me lean the bike and just glide around as I throttle on. WOW!! What a difference!

Not too many long curvy roads around here, but I got to working the technique anyhow. Well... this past weekend, hubby and I rode down to Lynchburg, VA for an event. And while he was doing his thing, I went on my own adventure. I covered almost 400 miles and found some amazing curvy roads. I had a BLAST!!!

The roads that have a sign posted "no thru tractor trailers" are the best. Switchbacks you wouldn't believe. Few cars or other traffic either.

P
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#44 Unread post by MZ33 » Mon Oct 13, 2008 8:38 pm

^Glad you had a great time, and an epiphany to boot. I will tuck that away for future twisty reference.

That photo of Deals Gap is beautiful. My current idea of a twisty is an S-curve . . . :laughing:
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#45 Unread post by shalihe74 » Mon Oct 13, 2008 9:41 pm

:cheerleader: :cheerleader: Hooray, Lion_Lady!! :cheerleader: :cheerleader:

Fun, ain't it? :mrgreen:
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#46 Unread post by Lion_Lady » Tue Oct 14, 2008 3:25 pm

MZ33 wrote:^Glad you had a great time, and an epiphany to boot. I will tuck that away for future twisty reference.

That photo of Deals Gap is beautiful. My current idea of a twisty is an S-curve . . . :laughing:
The roads I found had turns TIGHTER than the Deal's Gap picture. They were fun!

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#47 Unread post by TylerR » Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:38 pm

Lion_Lady wrote: Huh! If I look waaaay around a curve, it helps me lean the bike and just glide around as I throttle on. WOW!! What a difference!
Ain't those epiphanies awesome? :) I remember one I had earlier this year... just riding with a good friend of mine on a weekday (long lunch :D) and I just decided to relax and practice some of the techniques some of my mentors had been teaching me... relax, look through the turn, lean slightly off the seat (not hanging off but shifting my butt), throttle out of the turn... holy muthah!! It was probably one of the best times I've had on the bike!!! 8)

Even after 9 years of riding, there are still days when it seems I have to really focus and work at it and other days when everything just clicks and it's like buttah... and I can have both of those types of moments in the same day!

Everyone has their own learning curve and everyone will have those "AH HAH!!" moments. Key is to always ride your own ride and not feel any pressure to keep up or catch up. One of the joys of riding is to enjoy your surroundings... if all you're focused on is keeping up, you lose that. :2cents
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#48 Unread post by beemergirl » Wed Dec 17, 2008 1:26 pm

One of the best methods to become more comfortable with curves is to attend a local track day. This will allow one to practice in a controlled envirnoment.
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