LADIES: Are you "mechanically inclined"?

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Candy750
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LADIES: Are you "mechanically inclined"?

#1 Unread post by Candy750 » Fri Oct 06, 2006 12:38 pm

I have been trying to be sort of independant with a few things - like putting on the windshield, buying the hardware for the backrest plate, installing the backrest and brackets... I figure if I put it on, I can take it off and put it back on again... It's a woman's perogative to change her mind!

Anyway, it takes me probably 10 times as long as it would take my hubby. He works with his hands and tools for his livlihood. I work with numbers in an office. I'm never going to be ready to rejet carbuerators or take off any major parts and replace them (car, bike, vacuum cleaner!) I have changed my own car oil. I must admit I wouldn't ride in a car that I put the tire on.

So - how mechanical are you? How did you get there?
Last edited by Candy750 on Fri Oct 06, 2006 12:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#2 Unread post by deedee1 » Fri Oct 06, 2006 12:42 pm

I can do most stuff on a car and fix the vacuum and whatever else needs to be fixed. I am not ti sure about working on the bike yet. I will leave that to hubby for now :D .

My dad taught me everything he could on the car so if I was ever in a bad spot I could fix it myself. Alot of stuff I learned on my own by t :D rial and error ex: the vacuum cleaner. I would much rather be working ons tuff like that then cleaning house or shopping.

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#3 Unread post by jonnythan » Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:06 pm

Moderately. I build computers, I've changed various large components on my car (struts, wheel bearings, driveshafts, etc), and changed a few small things in my bike. I got there by necessity... getting new struts and control arm bushings installed on a car is big bucks ($500+), but the parts themselves were about $100. Same thing with brakes and wheel bearings. I was in college and just couldn't afford that stuff. Luckily I have a friend with a large, very well stocked garage and, even more luckily, he loves working on cars so much he gets excited when I drove over to fix something.

I've learned a ton from him.
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#4 Unread post by KarateChick » Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:06 pm

I don't fix vacuum cleaners cause I dislike cleaning.
Ya right, :wink: there are only 2 kinds of bikes: It's a Ninja... look that one's a Harley... oh there's a Ninja... Harley...Ninja...

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#5 Unread post by Z (fka Sweet Tooth) » Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:18 pm

I don't know the first thing about working on cars or bikes, I leave that up to my husband because that's what he enjoys doing anyways. I don't mind getting my hands dirty and learning a little bit but I would never do it myself.
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#6 Unread post by MonkeyMaw » Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:27 pm

My father collects and restores antique cars, the kind with gas lamps, so I was raised with a toothbrush in one hand and brass polish in the other. I feel comfortable doing routine maintenance on my cars and bike, but I might shy away from the internal stuff.
I have found Haynes manuals, with their big pictures and simple wording, to be immensely helpful. I also have a great coach/boyfriend with a large collection of metric tools.
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#7 Unread post by Shorts » Sat Oct 07, 2006 6:48 pm

Yes, I am mechanically inclined. I am the son my dad never had...tom-boy :lol:

I was always interested in what dad was working on outside, so, since I was hanging around, I was the go-fer. That's where I learned everything I know. Watching him, helping him and when I was old enough, working on my own projects. So general maintenance on the trucks, fix-ups around the house, the yard, hunting, etc - I do.


Unfortunately, I was much faster and smoother when I had two hands. One hand for mech work sux!


+1 deedee! :righton:

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#8 Unread post by Lion_Lady » Mon Oct 09, 2006 6:49 pm

I can put together a set of IKEA shelves and build stuff with wood (nothing too complex, mind you), but as for engines and stuff, I was a babe in the woods.

I know how to check the oil and add gasoline...

BUT. Since buying my first BMW motorcycle and joining the local and very active group, I've gone from "I could probably do that" to doing the 6K service with guidance, to doing the 12k service mostly by myself (at a club tech day where there was help a shout away): I changed the oil, checked the valve clearance, synced the throttle bodies and changed the transmission/drive fluid. I needed help with some of the 'muscle' stuff like getting the spark plugs out and removing the gas tank to get to the air filter.

Not too shabby.

I'm still baffled by the 'HOW' things work which makes trouble shooting so much easier, but getting better at that, too.

P
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#9 Unread post by Veda » Mon Oct 09, 2006 9:20 pm

I don't mind pulling apart things like the computer or the vacuum, but when it comes to my daily transportation I would rather let a professional do most of the work. The last thing I want to do is mess with the engine and then have it fall apart when I'm 100 miles from home, ya know?

I would like to know more about bikes/cars, but I don't want to practice on my own. I don't trust my work.

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#10 Unread post by RozStar » Tue Oct 10, 2006 9:45 am

I'm pretty much mechanically inclined, probably since I was an only girl with two older brothers. I had a mechanic do most of the work for my new (used) bike, but I'm gonna take a stab at installing the new ignition switch and I may try to clean out the gas tank myself. Since I like to wear my nails manicured, I just make sure I wear thick rubber gloves!

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#11 Unread post by darsek » Tue Oct 17, 2006 12:40 am

I have done some stuff on my car, and have done general service on a John Deere, but I am totally new to bikes. My Dad made sure I knew how to check my fluids and change a tire before I started driving my first car and now that I have a bike I want to be able to maintain/fix it as well...or at least be able to if/when necessary...or at least know what the mechanic is talking about :lol:
So I signed up for a (ladies only) motorcycle workshop at the local community college. It is over 2 Fridays and is an intro to their motorcycle program. I'm hoping to get a good overview there, at least learn some good MC vocabulary and how to change the oil, lube the chain correctly, adjust brakes/clutch, etc.

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#12 Unread post by NJ-Pinay » Thu Oct 19, 2006 8:10 pm

I am mechanically inclined to absolutely nothing. I take care of the house and hubby takes care of the cars and the motorcycles.
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#13 Unread post by Rebeccaatthewell » Tue Oct 31, 2006 10:18 pm

Well first I wrecked it in a "soft" slide. Then I waited a year for someone to fix it who never quite could get it done. So, I bought the book and talked to a guy I know who used to ride a lot who is now blind and he talked me though rebuilding the clutch master cylander and then bleeding the line. And when it still wouldn't start I explored until I found the part that was missing (some plunger thingy that was lost by the guy who never got around to fixing it) and I found in on an OEM website and ordered the part, installed it and now it works ... except the battery is dead! And I am scared to death to try and tackle electricty! Now, I am just trying to afford a trailer so I can get the darn thing somewhere where the battery can be pulled off and replaced. Sigh... It has been a long long year.

It is a lot harder when you have no one but yourself, but if you don't do it, then it never gets done.

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#14 Unread post by Shorts » Tue Oct 31, 2006 11:52 pm

Rebeccaatthewell wrote:Well first I wrecked it in a "soft" slide. Then I waited a year for someone to fix it who never quite could get it done. So, I bought the book and talked to a guy I know who used to ride a lot who is now blind and he talked me though rebuilding the clutch master cylander and then bleeding the line. And when it still wouldn't start I explored until I found the part that was missing (some plunger thingy that was lost by the guy who never got around to fixing it) and I found in on an OEM website and ordered the part, installed it and now it works ... except the battery is dead! And I am scared to death to try and tackle electricty! Now, I am just trying to afford a trailer so I can get the darn thing somewhere where the battery can be pulled off and replaced. Sigh... It has been a long long year.

It is a lot harder when you have no one but yourself, but if you don't do it, then it never gets done.

Becca
Hey Becca, the battery should be a piece of cake (assuming you already got to it under the seat or whereever it sits). Its just like a car battery, one ground (black) and the hot/power (red) wire. Just disconnect the two (mine are held on by a phillips head screw), pull the old battery out and drop the new one in place, then reconnect the leads and you're set :D

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#15 Unread post by Candy750 » Wed Nov 01, 2006 9:44 am

That's what my hubby says - if you read the manuals, you should be able to do it!!
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#16 Unread post by Rebeccaatthewell » Wed Nov 01, 2006 1:20 pm

Well, the battery is underneath the entire bike on a little pannel that has to be lowered to get to it. If it was more accessable I might not mind so much, but it is massivly hard to work with underneath the bike.

However, thanks for the encouragement:)

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#17 Unread post by Nalian » Wed Nov 01, 2006 3:13 pm

You can rent motorcycle trailers from U-haul for pretty cheap (I think like $35 a day or something like that, unlimited miles) - that might be a better option for you.

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#18 Unread post by Lion_Lady » Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:18 am

For me, I'm a visual learner. Manuals do almost NOTHING for me it I need to learn from scratch.

Now, if someone can show me a task, THEN I can go back and use the manual to reinforce it if I need to.

I just did a 6K service on my Rockster the other night (closer to 20K, than 18K oops)... valve adjustment (actually more a 'check' only one valve was out of spec), and oil/filter change.

I admit that I should have done the throttle body sync, but hubby had the ThrottleBody Master hooked up almost before I had my gear off from the warm up ride. And THAT too was a 'confirm' rather than any adjustment needed.

I'm getting there.

P
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#19 Unread post by Candy750 » Thu Nov 02, 2006 2:43 pm

Awesome! I have a hard time matching up what is in the manual, instructions to what is right in front of me. I can read the description, but then I go and look at it, and it makes no sense. Also, I have a little trouble with figuring out how stuff goes - like it will take me four tries to put the last piece of a jigsaw puzzle in!
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#20 Unread post by Roberta X » Sun Nov 05, 2006 8:50 pm

I'm pretty mechanical -- of three kids, I was the one who took apart alarm clocks, found out how the talking doll talked, and eventually got into all sorts of tech-y things. But I'm not much good at heavy lifting and I usually need drawings to figure out complex mechanical things. (My brother and sister had other skills).

With cars and my scooter, if all it takes is determination and the instructions, I'll try it and usually succeed. If it calls for serious skills (setting the valves on an MGB, for instance), I try to find an expert. A lot of these things, though, you just have to be willing to take your time and get kind of dirty; there's no big secret to it.

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