can someone please help me

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denise04
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can someone please help me

#1 Unread post by denise04 » Wed Jul 01, 2009 8:57 am

im a beginner, i just bought a 250 nitehawk honda but im real paniky everytime im on it, last year i was thrown off a moped wich resulted in bad injuris to my arm now im tryingto learn o re this new bike but im very paniky!! i change the gears ok as a beginne but im afraid im goingo wreck orthrown off again. how do i overcome this fear?

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#2 Unread post by fireguzzi » Wed Jul 01, 2009 9:50 am

Find a local MSF class. Well worth the money.
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Re: can someone please help me

#3 Unread post by Ryethil » Wed Jul 01, 2009 5:34 pm

denise04 wrote:im a beginner, i just bought a 250 nitehawk honda but im real paniky everytime im on it, last year i was thrown off a moped wich resulted in bad injuris to my arm now im tryingto learn o re this new bike but im very paniky!! i change the gears ok as a beginne but im afraid im goingo wreck orthrown off again. how do i overcome this fear?
:welcome:

First of all let the bike rest for a day or two. Then relax and take a deep breath. If you're that scared that your posting is that trashed then *STOP* and think again why you want to ride a motorcycle. Riding is an extension of yourself and if you're that upset, this will never happen. You're not a bad person for rethinking your priorities. Just a sane one.

However if you still want to ride motorcycles, try and find an experienced friend that can help you. Take the MSF class. They use small bikes like your Nighthawk. As a side point, your choice of the small Honda was exactly what you should have done.

There used to be a few books about starting riding but I can't think of any of then now so you might visit your local dealer and ask them if they know of any. If the first one won't help you then go to another until you find one that's friendly. Don't be afraid of them. They don't bite and with business being down, they are ususally *very* friendly for they might sell products and services that make them money. So just take your time and find a good dealer. But I reinterate, sign up for the MSF class. You can take it as many times as you need to and they are there just for people like you that need help in learning to ride. :)

As a suggestion, when you find a friendly dealer, if you didn't buy the motorcycle new, you might have them inspect your bike for anything that may be wrong with it. A bike that isn't healthy or has quirks isn't going to be a help when learning. Why add to your problems when you don't even know what they are yet. :)

Now comes the part that is most important. Find a place that you don't have to deal with traffic and just ride around slowly. The best place is usually a great big parking lot. For starters, most new riders find the idea of leaning a motorcycle over firghtening. If that is the case then just ride around slowly and try to relax. Trying things without worrying about traffic will help you a lot. Remember you're doing this for your enjoyment. There is no pressure to do this immediately. Just relax and learn that the bike isn't out to get you and motorcycles are stable creatures for the most part. If you drop it, you should be going real slow and you shouldn't hurt anything but your pride. So when your heart stops pounding, just pick up the bike up and try it again. No pressure!

I won't go over the basics here because you seem really waxed and need to slow down and relax. All of us here learned to ride and we aren't *ALL* superwomen. :laughing:

I'm sorry your suffered a trauma when you were first learning to ride. But accept this as truth. I know from experience a small motorcycle is much more stable then a powered bicycle. So try and put away what happened to you before you got a motorcyle. It will be hard but let the bike teach you differently. We were all scared when we started out. Some of us had bad things happen to us the first time we rode.

Don't tell anybody but the first time I rode a motorcycle (it was a dirt bike) I managed to go straight across a field and into the side of a barn without veering form my path or thinking about using the brakes. I swore I'd never ride a motorcycle again. But after over 10 years on the road and several bikes later, I'm still riding. I've got a post that you might read about riding called "Upper Body Strength" where even I had a problem about adjusting to a new bike and realized that I had to go back to the basics. Just between us Gurls, it takes a bit more for us to learn to ride but in the end, we enjoy riding just as much as the guys do.

Hey, it's all cool...

:rockon:
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thanks

#4 Unread post by denise04 » Thu Jul 02, 2009 10:45 am

thanks for your advice its really a cute bike hahah i just must learn i can stop thebike nomatter what gear im in withthebrake. a dog tried to run out in front of me i think that scared me to. my husband tries to teach me but at times i go out on my own.i wish i had one of you ladies ridin with me hahahah. rite now ionlygo 35 down back road the curves are scary but i just put my brakes on goig around the curve thanksfor your advice.

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Re: thanks

#5 Unread post by PacificShot327 » Thu Jul 02, 2009 5:30 pm

denise04 wrote:thanks for your advice its really a cute bike hahah i just must learn i can stop thebike nomatter what gear im in withthebrake. a dog tried to run out in front of me i think that scared me to. my husband tries to teach me but at times i go out on my own.i wish i had one of you ladies ridin with me hahahah. rite now ionlygo 35 down back road the curves are scary but i just put my brakes on goig around the curve thanksfor your advice.
Aaaaah - don't brake while you're making a turn. Cornering uses traction; braking uses up traction. Do all of your braking BEFORE you start turning. It puts tension on the wheels, and you need to have as much traction available for turning as possible.
"Man cannot remake himself without suffering, for he is both the marble and the sculptor." Alexis Carrel

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#6 Unread post by mazer » Thu Jul 02, 2009 7:39 pm

here is a good idea. When you have extra time to ride, go pick an empty huge parking lot, the bigger the better and go practice, practice, practice, practice, practice. You can not learn if you dont fall.
I see your name is Pacificshot, are you in California by chance? If so I have some great places for you to go to in order to get some great teaching.

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#7 Unread post by PacificShot327 » Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:06 pm

mazer wrote:here is a good idea. When you have extra time to ride, go pick an empty huge parking lot, the bigger the better and go practice, practice, practice, practice, practice. You can not learn if you dont fall.
I see your name is Pacificshot, are you in California by chance? If so I have some great places for you to go to in order to get some great teaching.
Huh? lol I was responding to the OP... I've been here for a little while now, Mazer. :-)
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#8 Unread post by mazer » Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:08 pm

yeah I caught that the second I posted, I tried to edit but the computer got freaked out and would not let me play. SOOOOOOO denise04 if YOU are in Northern California I know of a place where you can get free assistance.
Sorry bout that PacificShot....my bad.

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Re: thanks

#9 Unread post by Lion_Lady » Sat Jul 04, 2009 9:19 am

denise04 wrote:thanks for your advice its really a cute bike hahah i just must learn i can stop thebike nomatter what gear im in withthebrake. a dog tried to run out in front of me i think that scared me to. my husband tries to teach me but at times i go out on my own.i wish i had one of you ladies ridin with me hahahah. rite now ionlygo 35 down back road the curves are scary but i just put my brakes on goig around the curve thanksfor your advice.
Denise. I'm going to put my foot down here. There is no way to say it gently... Please, stop trying to teach yourself how to ride Please How far are you from a place to take the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's Basic Riders Course www.msf-usa.org

Your husband can only teach you what he knows. Unless he has a good handle on what a learning rider needs (in order to for you to 'grasp' whats being taught) as well as how to teach the key foundation bits of riding - you could still get seriously hurt.

How do you think he'll feel if after his instruction, you go out on your own and get killed? Would you want that on him? Do you think he understands that?

The Basic Riders Course starts from the beginning. From using the clutch and throttle smoothly, to starting and stopping, to shifting gears, as well as how to swerve safely to avoid an obstacle

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#10 Unread post by follow » Sun Jul 05, 2009 6:02 pm

Dang she put her foot down....you heard the lady!!!
take the time to take the course....
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Hello and welcome to the forum

#11 Unread post by Gina » Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:05 am

I understand your fear. I wrecked my bike the second time I had it on the road and totaled it and hurt myself. And I did have to re-think and decide if that's what I really wanted just as someone advised above. However, I still had the desire after weighing all the options.
I scheduled myself for the MSF course and stayed (almost always) in a parking lot or the field behind my house until time for the course.
I learned so much in the course.
There is something about being able to see others in front of you do what you're supposed to. It shows you how it is to be done---that others can do it----and if you're not holding your head up or looking ahead, the instructors point out what you're doing wrong and that helps you too.
After the class, my confidence was not completely restored but it was much better. I had the skills to know that I could do what I needed to do without going into a panic.
I checked out a couple of books on riding at the library and watched instructional videos too. I learned as much as I could before I went back out on the road. Then I took it in baby steps as one book suggested.
Now, I pull out onto the road with excitement in my heart instead of fear. Having the right gear makes me feel more confident too. I have a bright neon orange jacket that makes me much more noticeable.
If you decide you are going to do this, decide to go about it the right, safest way and you will conquer your fear. Also, last but certainly not least, I prayed and every time I set out on my bike I ask God to give me wisdom to use the knowledge I have gained and to bless me with a safe ride. My prayer for you is that you also will be blessed and that your riding skills will increase and that your pleasure will also. :lol:
Help me, Jesus!
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