2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

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2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic
2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic
2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic
2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic
2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic
2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic
2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic
2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic


– 2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

Return of a legend.
We must step back 40 years to understand how the mythical Moto Guzzi V7 Sport, has evolved into today’s V7 Cafè Classic. In 1969 the Mandello del Lario mechanics increased the displacement of their transverse 90° V engine from 703 to 757cc which greatly increased the performance without diminishing the great reputation of reliability and sturdiness that was behind the success of the V7. Fully aware of the power of this engine, Moto Guzzi decided to build a faired prototype of the V7 Special with the new 757cc engine. The result was an immediate success and set numerous speed records on the high speed ring of the Monza track.

No one at that time had ever dreamt of achieving such results from a bike created from a touring bike like the V7 Special. The effects of such an accomplishment gave Moto Guzzi the incentive to create a sports model. That task was given to Lino Tonti, one of the most brilliant Italian designers in history. Boasting excellent performance, the V7 Sport impressed the public and critics alike for being one of a few, mass produced bikes in the world, able to exceed a maximum speed of 125 mph. This original icon of “Italian style” sports bikes, magically reappears today in the distinct lines of the new V7 Cafè Classic. The similarities with its renowned ancestor are easy to see in the unique color, rich chrome, and other stylistic features common to both. The slanted half-handlebars, the instrument cockpit and other details are unmistakably Moto Guzzi V7.

STYLE
V7 Cafè Classic’s design is very similar to the style of the famous V7 Sport, faithfully maintaining the forms and size of the tank and side covers.
This style is one of the very best examples of Italian design of the 70s, so famous in fact that trade press didn’t delay in declaring the V7 Sport the archetype of Italian sport bikes where the essence of style conveys the effectiveness of the function for which the bike was designed.
There are many similarities between the original V7 Sport and the new V7 Cafè Classic starting with the particularly compact front thanks to the two slanting half-handlebars that tempt the rider to take an aerodynamic position with eyes on the instruments and body just a span from the top of the tank, the latter painted in the “Legnano” colors, a shade of green and metallic gold that, in a satin tone, reminds us of the typical color of the sportiest Moto Guzzi bikes.
Celebration of the “Seventies” style continues with the profusion of chroming, spoke wheels, upswept mufflers, the instrument dials inspired by the famous Veglia-Borletti and the seat with integrated tail that follows the line of the rear fender, the latter in a dark color matching the front.

COMFORT
Sporting and comfortable.
V7 Cafè Classic is a light and compact motorcycle, immediately offering you the feeling of being in control thanks to the decidedly sporty riding position.
The rider is not forced to squeeze into the indents of the tank, on the V7 Cafè Classic you get comfortable in the saddle sitting down into it, in the classic style of the 70s. The footrest, saddle and handlebar “triangle” position has been designed in such a way that most of the rider’s weight is concentrated at the front as is good practice on sports bikes. This might give you the impression that the position is restricting but this is not so thanks to the correct slanting angle of the adjustable half-handlebars, the footrest that is slightly forward and to the generously padded saddle.
Rear suspension also helps greatly in terms of comfort with the dual shock absorbers that allow 118 mm of wheel travel and the ability to adjust the spring preload to adapt the suspension to different riding conditions. While riding, the cockpit that reminds us of the Veglia-Borletti instrument dials of the 70s is a real pleasure: but so we don’t forget that we’re riding a modern bike there’s a dual display with clock, external temperature and total/trip odometer functions that fits in discreetly with the speedometer and tachometer.

FRAME
As precise as a razor.
The versatility of the V7 Cafè Classic required a chassis that was suitable for in town riding and for the bends of a mountain pass, able to provide confidence during brisk riding but also guaranteeing comfort on a par with the Moto Guzzi reputation.
A chassis with top quality components offers excellent road-holding qualities and stability that makes riding easy and pleasant for novices but is also appreciated by expert riders.
The key element of the bike is the double-cradle frame with bolted, removable bottom tubes. A great deal of care has been taken with steering geometry where the headstock slants 27°50’, an angle that ensures stability and precision when changing direction. The Marzocchi fork with 40 mm stems provides 130mm of front suspension travel and is combined with the action of two rear shock absorbers (with spring preloading adjustment) which extend 118 mm. Braking consists of a floating 320 mm front disc and a 260 mm rear. The wheel selection is also worthy of note, the front being 18” and the rear 17” for high profile tires that ensure excellent handling and steering feedback.

ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION
Torque for fun and all the power you need
Famed for its reliability and low fuel consumption, the 744 cc 90° V twin with a bore of 80 mm and stroke of 74 mm houses special graphite low wear pistons in aluminum alloy cylinders.
The small block from Mandello is fed by an electronic Weber Marelli fuel injection system with 36 mm throttle bodies and a Lambda probe that allows the engine to run smooth and with low exhaust emissions.
In terms of maximum performance, peak torque of 54.7 Nm comes in at only 3600 rpm while maximum power output is nearly 50 CV. This power is synchronized to perfection with the characteristics of the V7 Cafè Classic. This bike has no need to race against the clock, it was built to enjoy the ride. Like the Moto Guzzi, of the past the booming sound from the V twin provides great music to ride with.

The five-speed gearbox is precise with neutral easy to find and the ratios have been chosen for best performance and good economy.

MAIN CHARACTERISTICS

DESIGN
– Tanks and side panels with 70s style Moto Guzzi graphics.
– Adjustable half-handlebar.
– Twin saddle with 70s style
– Chromed passenger grab handles.
– Chromed rocker boxes.
– Chromed adjustable sport handlebars
– Spoke wheels.
– Chromed heat shields.
– Chromed instrumentation.
– 70s style instrument graphics.
– Color coded rear mudguard.
– Chromed rear light cluster.
– Chromed locking tank filler.

ENGINE
– 744 cc 90° V two valve twin.
– Weber Marelli electronic fuel injection.
– Single plate clutch.
– New high performance exhaust system.
– 5-speed gearbox.
– Euro 3.

FRAME
– ALS steel tubular twin cradle with removable lower components.
– 40 mm front forks.
– Pre-load and rebound adjustable twin rear shock absorbers.
– Front brakes – 320 mm disc and 4 (opposed) piston calipers.
– Rear brakes – 260 mm disc with floating caliper fitted with 2 parallel pistons.
– Spoke wheels.
– Metzeler Lasertec 100/90- 18 56H TL front tire.
– Metzeler Lasertec 130/80 -17 65H TL rear tire.

 

A HALF-HANDLEBAR LEGEND.

We first have to take a forty-year step backwards if we want to understand how the mythical Moto Guzzi V7 Sport, which inspired today’s V7 Cafè Classic, has evolved. In 1969 the Mandello del Lario mechanics increased the cubic capacity of their transverse 90° V engine from 703 to 757cc which greatly increased the level of maximum performances without in any way diminishing the notorious reputation of reliability and sturdiness that was behind the success of the V7 in the market and with the police forces of half the world. Fully aware of the power of this engine, Moto Guzzi decided to publish the results, building a faired prototype of the V7 Special with the new 757cc engine which, in June and October of that same year on the high speed ring of the Monza track, set numerous records among them the 100 km, at an average speed of 218,426 km/h and the 1,000 km at an average of 205,932 km/h.

No one at that time had ever dreamt of such results from a bike created from an openly declared touring bike which was the V7 Special, so much so that the effects of such an accomplishment gave Moto Guzzi the incentive to create a sports model that was greatly appreciated by a new public compared to that acquired with the previous V7s. The task was given to Lino Tonti, one of the most brilliant Italian designers who, using the generous forms of the 750cc engine, built a highly streamline CrMo tubular frame. Low, long and hunched over the suspensions, the V7 Sport made its first appearance in the market with a rather unusual chromatic combination, obtained with the “Legnano” green used for the upper structures contrasting with the red frame of the first 150 specimens assembled in the Moto Guzzi testing department using a CrMo tubular frame as well as some changes to distribution and ignition details with respect to the next versions which had a black coloured frame.
Boasting an excellent dynamic performance, the V7 Sport impressed the public and critics alike for being the first mass produced bike in the world able to exceed the maximum speed of 200 km/h and this fact was worthy of a report in 1972 by a renowned Italian motorbike magazine. Symbol of the “Italian style” sports bike, all substance and no frills, the V7 Sport magically reappears today in the distinct lines of the new V7 Cafè Classic.

The similarities with its renowned ancestor blend together in the excellence of its dynamic performance and in the class of the stylistic features common to both, like the “Legnano” green of the upper structures, the rich chromings, the slanted half-handlebars, the instrument cockpit and other details that are unmistakably Moto Guzzi.

Technically speaking, the V7 Café Classic differs from its Tourer sister in having twin raised silencers that, apart from increasing ground clearance, provide a sportier exhaust note more suited to this model that, like its famed predecessor, boasts exceptional road-holding. The key to this legendary road-holding lies in its twin cradle frame with removable bolt-on lower components. Great attention was paid to the steering geometry where the rake is set at 27° 50′ to ensure stability and precision when cornering. Of no less importance are the 40 mm Marzocchi forks. Travel on the front suspension is 130 mm and works in combination with two adjustable rear shock absorbers with 118 mm travel. Braking is looked after by a 320 mm floating disc at the front and a 260 mm disc at the rear. The V7 Classic is fitted with 18″ wheels up front and 17″ at the rear with high profile tyres so as to offer superb handling and feed-back characteristics.

 

 

 

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic – USA Specifications
MSRP: $8,990 USD

ENGINE
Type Four-stroke V 90 twin
Capacity 744cc
Bore and stroke 80×74 mm
Compression ratio 9.6:1
Timing 2 valves per head operated by light alloy pushrods
Timing diagram
Intake valve opening 18° before TDC
Intake valve closure 50° after LDC.
exhaust valve opening 53° before LDC
exhaust valve closure 15° after TDC.
(with 1 mm of play between rocker gear and valves)

Maximum power output 35.5 kW at 6,800 rpm (48.8 CV)
Max Torque 54.7 Nm at 3,600 rpm
Fuel supply Weber-Marelli electronic fuel injection.
Exhaust system Three-way catalyser with lambda probe

TRANSMISSION
Gearbox 5-speed
Gear ratios
1st 11/26 = 1 : 2.3636
2nd 14/23 = 1 : 1.6429
3rd 18/23 = 1 : 1.2778
4th 18/19 = 1 : 1.0556
5th 20/18 = 1 : 0.9

Lubrication Forced lubrication with lobe pump – capacity 1.78 kg
Primary drive Helicoidal gears, ratio 16/21=1:1.3125
Final drive Shaft drive, ratio 4.825
Clutch Dry single plate with flexible couplings

FRAME
Frame ALS steel tubular dismountable twin cradle
Wheelbase 1,449 mm
Trail 109
Steering rake 27°50′
Front suspension Marzocchi Ø 40 mm telescopic front forks
Front wheel travel 130 mm
Rear suspension Oscillating light alloy swingarm with 2 pre-load adjustable shock absorbers.
Rear wheel travel 118 mm
Brakes Brembo
Front brake: Floating 320 mm stainless steel disc
4 opposed calipers of differing diameters
Rear brake: 260 mm stainless steel disc

Brake pump cylinder diameter
Front pump 13 mm
Rear pump 13 mm
Caliper diameter
Front caliper 30/34 mm
Rear caliper 32 mm
Brake surface area Front 21.3 cm², rear. 16.1 cm²
Brake pad material Front Frendo 222, rear Ferodo ID 450

Wheels spoken steel rims
Front wheel 2.50″ X18″
Rear wheel 3.50″ X17″
Tyres
Front Metzeler Lasertec 100/90- 18 56H TL
Rear Metzeler Lasertec 130/80 -17 65H TL

ELECTRICS
Voltage 12 V
Battery 12 V – 14 Amp/h
Alternator 12 V – 330 Watt
Headlight 12 V – 55/60 W
Rear light 12V – 5/21 W
Indicators 12V – 10 W

DIMENSIONS
Length 2,185 mm
Width 800 mm
Height 1,115 mm
Saddle height 805 mm
Minimum ground clearance 182 mm
Steering angle. 32°
Dry weight 182 kg
On the road weight 198 kg
Type of tank Plastic
Fuel tank capacity 17 litres
Reserve 2.5 litres

 

 

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic – Canada Specifications
MSRP: $10,795 CDN


ENGINE
Type : Four-stroke V 90 twin
Cooling : Air and oil cooled with independent cooling pump
Capacity : 1,151cc
Bore and stroke : 95 x 81.2 mm
Compression ratio : 11 : 1
Timing diagram : Intake valve opening 36° before upper TDC.
(play 1 mm) Intake valve closing 62° after lower TDC.
Exhaust valve opening 58° before lower TDC.
Exhaust valve closing 30° after upper TDC.
Measured with rocker arm/valve play
of 1.5 mm
Maximum power output : Over 80.8 kW (110 CV) at 7,500 rpm
Max Torque : Over 108 Nm at 6,400 rpm
Fuel supply/ignition : Multipoint sequential electronic injection, Magneti Marelli IAW 5A
phased, alfa-n system; 2 x Ø50 mm throttle bodies with Weber IWP
189 injectors, Lambda probe.
Starter : Electric
Spark plugs : NGK PMR8B (Long Life)
Exhaust system : Stainless steel two-into-one 3-way catalysed with Lambda probe.
Homologation :Euro 3

 

TRANSMISSION
Gearbox : 6 speed
Gear ratios : 1st 17/38 = 1 : 2.235
: 2nd 20/34 = 1 : 1.700
: 3rd 23/31 = 1 : 1.348
: 4th 26/29 = 1 : 1.115
: 5th 31/30 = 1 : 0.968
: 6th 29/25 = 1 : 0.862
Lubrication : Oil bath
Primary drive : Helicoidal gears, ratio 26/35 = 1 : 1.346
Final drive : CA.R.C reactive drive; double universal joint with floating bevel gear,
ratio 12/44 = 1 : 3,666
Clutch : Single plate with integrated flexible couplings

 

FRAME
Frame : High tensile steel tubular twin cradle
Wheelbase : 1,554 mm
Rake :108 mm
Steering rake : 26.30°
Steering angle. : 34°
Front suspension : Upside down Ø 43 mm fully adjustable forks (spring preload and
hydraulic for rebound and compression) with mounting for radial
callipers.
Front wheel travel : 120 mm
Rear suspension : Progressive single swingarm, fully adjustable monoshock with
separate gas reservoir (spring preload and hydraulic for rebound and
compression).
Rear wheel travel : 110 mm
Front brakes : Twin floating 320 mm stainless steel wave discs, radial callipers with
4 opposed pistons.
Rear brakes : Single 282 mm fixed stainless steel disc, floating calliper with 2
parallel pistons.
Wheels : Tubeless spoke wheels with aluminium Ber rim and Alpina spokes.
Front wheel : 3.50” x 17”
Rear wheel : 5.50” x 17”
Front tyre : 120/70 ZR17”
Rear tyre : 180/55 ZR17”

 

ELECTRICS
Voltage :12 V
Battery : 12 V – 18 Ah
Alternator : 12 V – 550 W

 

DIMENSIONS
Length : 2,260 mm
Width : 830 mm
Height : 1,070 mm
Saddle height : 800 mm
Minimum ground clearance : 185 mm
Dry weight : 222 kg
Fuel tank capacity : 16.7 litres
Riserve :3.3 litres
Technical data specified above for the Moto Guzzi GRISO 8V SE may be changed without prior notice.

About Michael Le Pard 858 Articles

“Mr. Totalmotorcycle”. Owner and Founder of Total Motorcycle. Supporting Motorcyclists and Motorcycling for 18 great years.

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