2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS Guide

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS 2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS 2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS 2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS: READY FOR ADVENTURES, BIG AND SMALL.

Introducing the 2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS…

How do you make the world’s favorite motorcycle even better? How about a dual-sport version that’s adventure ready? Meet the new 2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS, a thoroughly modern take on our original Honda Trail 90 and Trail 110 models. Like the other members of our miniMOTO family (the Super Cub, Monkey, and Grom), the Trail 125 ABS is built for the way we ride today—except with this bike, you can ride even more places. Rugged construction. Plenty of ground clearance. Light weight. Plus, our world-famous semi-automatic, no-clutch transmission. It all adds up to a machine that’s a blast around town, and even more fun on a dirt road. So what are you waiting for? Since our first Trail 90 more than 50 years ago, riders have known that it’s not the size of the bike in your next adventure; it’s how much adventure is in your bike!

Sixty years after Honda introduced customers to the joys of casual on- and off-road riding, the all-new 2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS (CT125) resurrects a revered brand by injecting a healthy dose of practical design and hassle-free technology to create a miniMOTO that—much like the Super Cub and Monkey—pays tribute to the past while adapting easily to modern lifestyles.

Debuted in 2019 as a concept model at the 46th Tokyo Motor Show, the CT125 received rave reviews, along with requests for a production model. That wish is now granted with the introduction of the 2021 Honda Trail 125, which expands upon the scope of the popular Super Cub C125 to include casual riding in rural settings, including two-track roads and trails.

This was accomplished by strengthening the C125 chassis, increasing suspension travel and improving fuel range. The engine is the same 125cc four-stroke, single-cylinder overhead-camshaft design operating two valves, but with a high-mounted air intake and upswept exhaust that enhance low-end and midrange power. As with the Super Cub, the Trail 125 has a four-speed semiautomatic transmission. The engine guard adds protection from obstacles like large rocks and tree stumps.

Honda’s designers maintained the distinctive look that propelled the purchase of hundreds of thousands of CT-series machines over six decades. With the launch of the Trail 125, Honda taps into the success of similarly nostalgic miniMOTO models to introduce riders to the joys of trekking on roads and trails.

“When American Honda was established in 1959 and began offering the Honda 50, Idaho dealer Herb Uhl started modifying it for off-road use, resulting in Honda producing the Trail 50,” said Lee Edmunds, Senior Manager of Powersports Marketing for American Honda. “That model became ubiquitous in American campgrounds and on motorhome bumpers in the ’60s and ’70s and led to a number of successors. For that reason, the CT brand has a special history with the U.S. market, and it’s great to see it return with the Trail 125 which, like the Super Cub and Monkey, harkens back to a golden era of American motorcycling but with modern technology and reliability.”

The 2021 Honda Trail 125 is scheduled for release in November and will be available in Glowing Red.

 

 

 

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS Totalmotorcycle.com Key Features

125cc FUEL-INJECTED ENGINE
Nobody can match Honda’s reputation for engines, and even though the Trail 125 ABS is relatively compact, it’s a giant in terms of performance and reliability. Air cooling keeps it super simple, too.

FOUR-SPEED SEMI-AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
The Trail 125 ABS features a four-speed semiautomatic transmission you shift with your left foot, like a traditional motorcycle. But here’s the unique part: there’s no clutch to worry about. Plus, the Trail 125’s heel-toe shifter makes operation even easier, especially in boots.

READY FOR ON- AND OFF-ROAD ADVENTURES
The best part of the Trail 125 is that it lets you ride so many places. On the street it’s a fun, practical commuter. And its light weight, skid plate, spark arrestor and ground clearance make it a joy in the dirt. Plus, since it has a license plate, you can ride it in areas restricted to some on-road-only bikes, like state and national parks.

STANDARD ABS
Our front-wheel Anti-Lock Braking System can be a big help in making controlled stops in less-than-ideal conditions, like on wet pavement or other compromised surfaces. It’s a great feature whether you’re using your new Trail 125 as a commuter or just riding it for fun, since it helps you stop with added confidence.

 

Honda CT Series History

In 1960, the efforts of a Honda motorcycle dealer in Boise, Idaho, came to the attention of Jack McCormack, the sales manager at the 1-year old American Honda Motor Co. As told by Aaron P. Frank in his book, Honda Motorcycles, McCormack had noticed the sales of the popular step-through Honda 50 were off the charts in an area known more for its surrounding rugged mountain terrain than an urban core. He contacted the owner, Herb Uhl, seeking an explanation.

“He told me how he was selling them as a trail bike, putting a cheater sprocket on the back and some knobby tires,” McCormack told Frank. Uhl sent one of his converted Honda 50s down to California for McCormack to inspect.

“It was a brilliant little machine,” McCormack said. “It worked so well because it was light, and with the automatic clutch you could climb logs. To do that on a big bike, you had to have a certain amount of skill. I saw lots of possibility for something like Herb was doing, selling it as a bike that you could go in the woods and hunt or fish with.”

McCormack sent the bike to American Honda’s parent company in Japan, with a request to build a production version of Uhl’s off-road adaptation. By March 1961, the CA100T Trail 50 was offered to Honda dealers across America.

Honda’s first foray into off-road motorcycling was an immediate success, hailed by Cycle World magazine with the recommendation that readers go “Trail Fiftying.” The model evolved through numerous upgrades and revisions, eventually becoming the popular CT brand. Over the course of nearly three decades, well over 725,000 units from the CT series were sold in the U.S.

1961 CA100T Trail 50

The first Uhl-inspired production Trail 50 transmitted its 49cc overhead-valve engine’s 5 horsepower through a three-speed semiautomatic transmission. Knobby tires were mounted on full-size, 17-inch wheels, and the original Honda 50’s leg shield and front fender were removed for better off-road utility. The front suspension retained the Honda 50’s then-modern, leading-link design. A double rear sprocket permitted changes to the overall gearing, a nod to the Trail 50’s off-road suitability. A single saddle was positioned ahead of a large chrome utility rack, which could be replaced by an optional passenger seat. A skid plate was provided to protect the low-slung engine. The street-legal headlight and taillight enhanced the bike’s dual-sport capabilities. The retail price was $275.

The model evolved over the next couple of years, getting updates like a 5cc larger engine, a thicker seat and an upswept muffler, and it soon earned the nickname “Hunter Cub” in some markets.

1964 CT200 Trail 90

In 1964, the CT200 Trail 90 was introduced, powered by a larger, air-cooled 87cc engine and a new four-speed semi-automatic transmission with a centrifugal clutch. It included a purposeful front fender with mudguard, and the high-mounted intake and exhaust protected the engine from ingesting water in stream crossings.

Two years later the name was changed to the CT90 Trail 90, with numerous upgrades. An all-new 89cc engine with a lightweight, aluminum-alloy head used a reliable chain-driven, overhead camshaft. The dual-rear-sprocket arrangement was replaced by a selectable reduction gear in the transmission, a feature Honda called “Posi-Torque” that effectively gave the CT90 an eight-speed gearbox—ideal for crawling over all types of terrain—with the flip of a lever on the transmission case. Dry weight was a feathery 179 pounds, and it was claimed to produce 7 horsepower at 8,500 rpm.

A compliant, telescopic fork was introduced in 1969, and one year later a foldable, swivel-lock handlebar was added, simplifying transport in a van, pickup or trailer. Turn signals were added in 1974, making the Trail 90 completely legal for street riding in all 50 states whenever desired.

CT70 Trail 70

Concurrent with the evolution of the larger CT models, the minibike-based CT70 Trail 70 was introduced in 1969 and was sold in the U.S. until 1982, then reintroduced in 1991 and carried over the next three years. The fun-to-ride Trail 70 was a prototypical play bike that took many of its styling cues from the popular Z50 dirt bike as well as the larger CTs, and the front and rear lighting added a desirable element of street-ability. The Trail 70’s success underscores its influence as one of the inspirations for the modern-day Honda Monkey.

CT110

For the 1981 model year, the CT110 was introduced, with an engine displacing 105cc, providing more usable power. The low-slung engine was guarded on each side by steel bars, protecting it from rocks, tree stumps and tip-overs. By this time—20 years after its first introduction—the popular CT series had developed an envious reputation not only among hunters, campers and fishermen for its off-road practicality, but also among farmers and ranchers as a capable, reliable and economical agricultural vehicle. In fact, Herb now refers to models in the CT series as “the original ATVs.”

CT125 Trail 125 ABS

In 2019, Honda unveiled the CT125 concept bike at the Tokyo Motor Show, where its throwback design made it a huge hit. Honda has enjoyed success with similarly nostalgic miniMOTO models including the Monkey and Super Cub, so the confirmation of a production Trail 125 for the 2021 model year is perhaps not surprising. Based on the Super Cub, but with updates to make it more off-road-capable, this model seems likely to be popular with customers in the U.S., the country that played such an important role in the models that the Trail 125 honors.

 

 

 

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS Totalmotorcycle.com Features and Benefits

PERFORMANCE

125cc FUEL-INJECTED ENGINE
Nobody can match Honda’s reputation for engines, and even though the Trail 125 ABS is relatively compact, it’s a giant in terms of performance and reliability. Air cooling keeps it super simple, too.

EASY TO PARK
Because the Trail 125 ABS is compact, it’s easy to park in the city, to load and unload from a motorhome, and to store when you’re not riding. There’s always room for a Trail 125!!

HYDRAULIC DISC BRAKES
The Trail 125 ABS features a 220mm front single disc brake for excellent stopping power, along with a 190mm rear disc. There’s even standard front-wheel ABS.

UPSWEPT EXHAUST AND INTAKE
Dirt bikes keep their intake and exhaust up high for better clearance and to keep them further from dirt and water. That’s what we’ve done with the Trail 125 ABS too. The exhaust also features a heat shield, and makes a big contribution to this awesome little bike’s overall style.

TRAIL-TUNED GEARING
We changed up the Trail 125 ABS’s final-drive gearing compared to the Super Cub’s. Adding three teeth to the rear sprocket gives it better hill-climbing ability on trails and dirt roads—the kind of places you’ll want to explore.

TECHNOLOGY

FOUR-SPEED SEMI-AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
The Trail 125 ABS features a four-speed semi-automatic transmission you shift with your left foot, like a traditional motorcycle. But here’s the unique part: there’s no clutch to worry about. Plus, the Trail 125’s heel-toe shifter makes operation even easier, especially in boots.

LED LIGHTING
Old-school light bulbs? Forget about them. The Trail 125 ABS features a full LED lighting package that’s lighter, brighter, and longer lasting. The headlight has a traditional round shape, while the indicators are squared off for a rugged look.

ELECTRIC STARTING
Turn the key, push a button, and you’re on the road—or the trail. But because adventure sometimes throws us an unexpected curve, we’ve also given the Trail 125 ABS a kickstart lever, just like the original Trail 90 and Trail 110 had.

STYLE

READY FOR ON- AND OFF-ROAD ADVENTURES
The best part of the Trail 125 is that it lets you ride so many places. On the street it’s a fun, practical commuter. And its light weight, skid plate, spark arrestor and ground clearance make it a joy in the dirt. Plus, since it has a license plate, you can ride it in areas restricted to some off-road-only bikes, like state and national parks.

RUGGED STEEL BACKBONE CHASSIS
The Trail 125 ABS is built for adventure. That’s why we gave it a special, reinforced steel backbone chassis. The design makes getting on and off easier, while providing great ground clearance and a rugged, ready-for-anything look.

ROOMY SEATING
With a 31.5-inch seat height and a taller handlebar, the Trail 125 ABS has a nice, roomy cockpit that makes it comfortable in just about every riding situation, from urban commutes to dirt roads.

MULTI-FUNCTION DIGITAL INSTRUMENTS
When it comes to instruments, the Trail 125 ABS is fully equipped. The digital display features a speedometer, odometer, A&B trip meters, fuel gauge, clock, and indicator for low/high beam.

ROUND HEADLIGHT
The Trail 125 ABS’s round headlight looks retro, but its LED performance is totally up to date and provides superior illumination and visibility.

UNDERSEAT FUEL TANK
With its 1.4-gallon fuel tank (larger than the Super Cub’s) and awesome fuel efficiency, the Trail 125 ABS offers a spectacular range. The tank filler is under the seat so it’s easy to access.

STANDARD ENGINE SKID PLATE
Who knows where your adventures are going to take you? That’s why we gave the Trail 125 ABS a sturdy skid plate and a pair of front brush-guard tubes, along with 6.5 inches of ground clearance.

CARGO RACK
Need to pack along some camping equipment, or gear to survive the zombie apocalypse? Check out the Trail 125 ABS’s large, flat rear cargo rack. Add our accessory cargo box and you’ll be ready for anything!

ACCESSORIES
Riding in cold weather? Check out the optional heated grips. An available rear cargo box is another favorite. And what about adding a 12-volt electrical port too—it’ll keep your devices charged while you’re on the go, or even let you run a GPS.

HANDLING

STANDARD ABS
Our front-wheel Anti-Lock Braking System can be a big help in making controlled stops in less-than-ideal conditions, like on wet pavement or other compromised surfaces. It’s a great feature whether you’re using your new Trail 125 as a commuter or just riding it for fun, since it helps you stop with added confidence.

17-INCH WIRE-SPOKE WHEELS
Real dirt bikes use spoked wheels, and so does the new Trail 125 ABS. They’re big enough to roll along smoothly even in rugged terrain, and they’re strong enough to handle riding on dirt roads (or gnarly city streets).

FRONT SUSPENSION
We gave the new Trail 125 ABS more suspension travel, for a smoother off-pavement ride. The telescopic fork is also protected by rubber accordion boots to keep dust out—and give it a cool retro look.

TWIN REAR SHOCKS
The Trail 125 ABS’s blackout twin rear shocks and coil springs not only look proper, but they also do a great job of smoothing out the road and trail. Preload adjustment is intuitive and easy.

CENTERSTAND
On a bike as rugged as the Trail 125 ABS, a centerstand just makes sense. It gives you more parking options than just a sidestand, especially if you’re carrying cargo on the rack. It also makes servicing your own bike easier.

 

 

 

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS – Totalmotorcycle.com USA Specifications/Technical Details
US MSRP Price: $3899 USD
Canada MSRP Price: $  CDN
Europe/UK MSRP Price: £ GBP (On The Road inc 20% Vat)

 

 

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS – Totalmotorcycle.com Canada Specifications/Technical Details

 

 

 

2021 Honda Trail 125 ABS – Totalmotorcycle.com European Specifications/Technical Details

 

 

 

Manufacturer Specifications and appearance are subject to change without prior notice on Total Motorcycle (TMW).

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