Inspiration Friday: Ride Like Rossi

Inspiration Friday: Ride Like Rossi

Inspiration Friday: Ride Like Rossi

The Man. The Myth. The #46 MotoGP Legend “The Doctor” retires. Inspiration Friday: Ride Like Rossi bring inspiration to all those who followed Valentino Rossi‘s 26 year championship racing career. Rossi was riding bikes from an early age thanks to the encouragement of his father starting in go-karts, then minimotos and in 1992 his first championship trophy. 1996 Valentino wins 11  races becoming the youngest ever rider to win the 125cc Title. 1999 Valentino repeats the championship but this time with Aprilia in the 250cc class. In 2000 under Honda he grabs the 500cc World Champion and then 2 MotoGP World Championships in 2002 and 2003 before joining Yamaha in 2004. From 2005-2021 he just keeps winning and getting better and better. Total Motorcycle has followed Valentino Rossi throughout his racing career right here. 115 time race-winner and 199 time a podium finisher Valentino Rossi definitely meets the criteria of a TMW influencer; now the question is, what are you going to do to walk in his footsteps?

“I enjoyed it a lot and it was the best way to finish. I am in the top ten best riders in the world and it means everything, because this result will never change. I also enjoyed the celebrations after the race. It was a long career and I want to say thanks to everybody.” – Rossi.

Enjoy your well-earned retirement Mr. Rossi from all of us at Total Motorcycle!

Celebrate Valentino Rossi’s Sensational Career with the new 2022 Special R1 GYTR VR46 Tribute right here on Total Motorcycle along with all the new 2022 Yamaha’s. To celebrate the legendary MotoGP career of the biggest star to grace the sport, Valentino Rossi, Yamaha Motor Europe has produced a special R1 GYTR VR46 Tribute, designed with unique specs, to give to the nine-time world champion for the many successful years spent at the pinnacle of motorcycle road racing with Yamaha (Aprilia and Honda too.)

It’s time to grab your helmet and show your support! We need your support by joining Total Motorcycle’s new YouTube Membership and $1/mo Patreon channels. Please help us help riders, support motorcyclists and motorcycling worldwide today.

Total Motorcycle would like to thank Yamaha and Valentino Rossi as well as the hundreds of millions of motorcycle riders who visit TMW for inspiring us to bring you this week’s Inspiration Friday: Ride Like Rossi. Each week we bring you another Inspiring Motorcycle story to inspire you to get out and ride!

2022 Yamaha YZF-R1 GYTR VR46 Tribute

End of an Era for Rossi and PETRONAS Yamaha SRT in Valencia

Valentino Rossi tenth and Andrea Dovizioso 12th in PETRONAS Yamaha SRT’s final MotoGP race.

It was the end of an era today at the Gran Premio de la Comunitat Valenciana, with Valentino Rossi ending the final MotoGP race of his career tenth. Team-mate Andrea Dovizioso made it a double points finish for PETRONAS Yamaha Sepang Racing Team in their final race, crossing the finish line 12th.

Rossi had a good start to his final MotoGP race, claiming two places in the opening corner to go eighth. Dropping back to tenth on lap 4, the Italian demonstrated good speed and pace throughout the season finale. Although he wasn’t able to close the gap to those in front, ‘Vale’ successfully defended his position and crossed the finish line for the final time tenth – bringing his amazing 26 years of Grand Prix racing to its conclusion.

Team-mate Dovizioso, who started 13th, also gained two places in the opening corners. The Italian had some early on-track battles, which pushed him down to 14th on the fifth lap. Mounting a recovery, he made it through to 12th before the midpoint of the race. With a gap to the riders ahead, ‘Dovi’ worked hard to reduce the deficit but ultimately wasn’t quite able to close up to those in front and crossed the line 12th.

The ValenciaGP signals the end of PETRONAS Yamaha Sepang Racing Team’s three years in the MotoGP championship, where they achieved 12 pole positions, 16 podium finishes and 6 wins. The Malaysian squad were also Independent Team Champions in 2019 and 2020.

Valentino Rossi
“I didn’t expect that it could be a weekend like this. I was very worried for this weekend because I didn’t know how I felt and there was a lot of pressure with many things to do. It was fantastic, I received a lot of positive energy from all the people in the paddock and I had a lot of great surprises: from seeing all my bikes on Thursday, to all the VR46 Academy riders with my helmets today. I’m also happy because I was able to be strong in both Qualifying yesterday and in the race today, finishing in the top-ten. I enjoyed it a lot and it was the best way to finish. I am in the top ten best riders in the world and it means everything, because this result will never change. I also enjoyed the celebrations after the race. It was a long career and I want to say thanks to everybody.”

Andrea Dovizioso
“We were much closer than we have been in other races today, so I’m happy to finish the season with that speed. We also worked well to improve the bike under braking, which meant I could take different lines. It was good for me that I could follow ‘Vale’ [Rossi] and Franco [Morbidelli] to learn how they ride the Yamaha, as they are very experienced with it. I’m very happy with today and it was a good way to finish the season.

“To be a team-mate of Rossi was strange, as I have always been in different teams to him, but it has been enjoyable. I tried to beat him but he was very strong and he always has something more to give in a race. It has been really nice to share the box with him at his final round and I feel lucky to have been part of it.

Johan Stigefelt – Team Manager
“We end these three years in MotoGP today and it has been a very interesting journey, from starting the team to achieving what we did. We’ve been second in the World Championship and had many race wins, podiums and pole positions. It has been a privilege to work with Valentino and Andrea this year and we have to be very proud of what we have done. We were able to build up a structure this big and this professional, with the support of PETRONAS and the other partners that believed in this project from the beginning.

“I want to thank everybody who was involved in this project from the bottom of my heart, from the crew to sponsors and partners – just everybody. I’m sad that it’s finishing, but I only have good things to say about these years. This is how it is sometimes, so just thank you again.”

Razlan Razali – Team Principal
“Today was an emotional day for the team, especially as it was Rossi’s last dance after a glorious 26 years. We are truly honoured that he has ended his career with us and it will go down in the history books that the last team he rode for was PETRONAS Yamaha SRT. At the same time it is the team’s final race as well and it was good that Andrea could finish inside the points in 12th as well. It has been a great three years, with great highs and lows. We have made tremendous achievements in that time though.”

Inspiration Friday: Ride Like Rossi

Valentino Rossi – The Career

Born in Urbino, Italy on February 16th, 1979, Rossi was riding bikes from an early age thanks to the encouragement of his father Graziano, himself a former Grand Prix winner. Following an early start in go-karts, Rossi junior progressed to minimotos and quickly showed a talent for two-wheels, becoming regional champion in 1992.

The next few years saw him quickly rise up through the ranks of junior road racing, claiming the Italian Sport Production Championship in 1994 and the Italian 125cc Championship in 1995. The latter, twinned with an impressive third place in the 125cc European Championship, was enough to secure him a ride in the World Championship the following year.

Rossi’s 125cc World Championship debut came at the Malaysian Grand Prix in 1996 and he finished his first international season in ninth place with one race win. The following year he became the youngest ever rider to win the 125cc Title, winning eleven races along the way with Aprilia.

The pattern continued when he moved up to the 250cc class, taking second place in his first year before becoming World Champion in 1999, once again with Aprilia.

In 2000, he entered a new phase of his career when he joined forces with Honda in the 500cc class. He proved his worth once again by finishing second, before becoming the last ever 500cc World Champion in 2001. Rossi subsequently took the MotoGP World Title in 2002 and 2003, before moving to Yamaha and dominating again in 2004 and 2005.

Rossi made history by moving to Yamaha in 2004 and winning the season opening Grand Prix in South Africa, becoming the first rider in the history of the sport to win back-to-back premier class races for different manufacturers. He won 9 out of 16 races, to clinch the World Championship Title. It was Yamaha’s first Championship win for 12 years, and they got to celebrate it with a victory at the penultimate Grand Prix in Phillip Island. A final win at the Valencia Grand Prix also ensured that the Yamaha Factory Team won the Team Title.

Rossi continued to dominate during the 2005 season, winning eleven races in total, taking five pole positions, and only finishing off the podium once. In doing so, at that time, he became one of only five riders in the history of the sport to win the premier-class title on five occasions. He also helped Yamaha to win the Constructor and Team titles; ensuring Yamaha celebrated its 50th anniversary with one of its best ever years in Grand Prix racing.

2006 saw the Italian finish as the World Champion runner-up for only the second time in his premier-class career, having lost the title to Honda’s Nicky Hayden by just five points following a final-race showdown in Valencia. Despite narrowly missing out on the title, Rossi still took five race wins and five pole positions in 2006 (more than any other premier class rider) and stood on the podium ten times.

2007 was one of the hardest seasons of his career. Rossi took four race wins that year and several podiums, but his prodigious talents were limited by technical and tyre problems, as well as plain bad luck. The Italian missed out on the runner-up spot in the championship by just one point after his final race was wrecked by injury.

Inspiration Friday: Ride Like Rossi

After a torrid two seasons, Rossi returned to winning form in 2008 and recaptured the MotoGP Title. The Italian won nine races – equal to his first season with Yamaha in 2004 – and stood on the podium at 16 out of 18 rounds. Notable highlights in an exceptional year included a seventh straight win at Mugello, a titanic duel with Casey Stoner in Laguna Seca (where Rossi had never previously won), and a historic victory at hurricane-struck Indianapolis. Rossi eventually took the title in the best possible way, with a victory at Yamaha’s home track in Japan, with three races to go. It was his eighth career title and his third with Yamaha.

2009 saw ‘The Doctor’ cross more milestones in his incredible career and take a ninth world championship title, his fourth with Yamaha. He showed that after 14 years of racing in the World Championship he was still the best rider of his generation and worthy of his crown. Rossi’s duel with his teammate Jorge Lorenzo reached epic proportions, with ‘the Battle of Barcelona’ due to go down in history as one of the greatest ever. Rossi was triumphant with an audacious last-corner move that saw him win by just thousandths of a second. His incredible run of Mugello victories came to an end, but he made up for it with a perfect performance at his home track of Misano, where he also took one of his seven pole positions. His victory in Holland was the 100th win of his career, further proof, if any was needed, that he truly is one of the greats. He finally secured the title at Sepang with several races still to run.

The next season was a challenge. The then reigning World Champion suffered a fall in practice at Mugello, breaking his leg and effectively ending any hopes of fighting against teammate Lorenzo for the title. As the season drew to a close, he made a comeback to score several podiums and a race win in Malaysia, wrapping up 2010 in third position despite having missed a total of four races. To the disappointment of Yamaha race fans the world over, it was at this point that the Italian chose to embark on a new adventure, leaving Yamaha for a two-year stint at Ducati.

It was with great excitement that the announcement finally came mid-season in 2012 that he would return to again partner Lorenzo in Yamaha Factory Racing, back where, many believe, he belongs.

The 2013 season proved to be a trying period. Rossi found it a big task to get to grips with the new qualifying system and the evolution of the Bridgestone tyres on the YZR-M1. Despite this, he made a welcome return to the top step of the podium with a victory in Assen and added a total of six podium finishes to his end of year tally.

The #46 rider was as enthusiastic as ever as he embarked on his ninth season with Yamaha in 2014. Looking to shake things up and get a fresh perspective, he took a big chance and opted to start the season with a new Crew Chief. Bringing Silvano Galbusera into the team proved to be a smart choice, the crew adapting quickly and working well together to achieve some impressive results. Rossi became a regular podium finisher and then made the extra step, sending his home crowd wild at the Misano circuit with a superb victory, a feat he was to repeat later in the year with a second win at Phillip Island to secure second in the final world standings.

Arriving to the 2015 season in top form and ready to attack, Rossi soon set the tone for Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd.’s 60th anniversary year. A win at Doha at the start of the 18-races long championship sent an early message that the Doctor was again going to be a force to be reckoned with as he let his experience shine. His strong opening race was followed by a total of 14 podiums, and thrilling victories in Argentina, Assen, and Silverstone. The only rider who could measure up to his flurry of consistent podium finishes was teammate Lorenzo. The fight for the title went down to the wire. Apart from two slight blips (Misano and Phillip Island), Rossi maintained a perfect podium score card until the final round. Though tension ran high in Malaysia and he was forced to start at the back of the grid in Valencia, he still managed to ride from 26th position to 4th place in a thrilling race that will be remembered as one of the best comeback-races in MotoGP history. However, despite showing his undeniable talent and dedication, it was not enough to secure him his tenth MotoGP World Championship title and he ended the season as the runner-up, five points behind his teammate.

Rossi meant business again in 2016. He climbed the rostrum for the first time that year in Argentina. Though struck by external circumstances on occasion, ‘The Doctor’ never lessened his attack and went on to secure nine further podium finishes, with wins in Jerez and Catalunya, remaining a key protagonist in the 2016 challenge until the overseas leg at the end of the year. He just missed out on the trophy, but secured the Vice-Champion Title for the third year in a row. Rossi’s and his teammate’s consistent drive did bring Yamaha its seventh FIM MotoGP Team Title.

2017 was a year full of highs and lows for the Italian. He started the season as a real contender for the Title, securing three consecutive podium finishes in Qatar, Argentina, and America, before the first trials came in Europe. Rossi had hoped to recover from a difficult weekend in Jerez by securing Yamaha’s 500th Grand Prix win in Le Mans. Unfortunately, a sensational battle with his teammate, Maverick Viñales, ended prematurely as it resulted in a DNC for the Italian. Soon after, ‘The Doctor’ had his first injury scare of the season. An MX accident saw the home hero arrive less than 100% at the round in Mugello and subsequently Catalunya. In Assen the crowds’ favourite was fully fit again and he marked the occasion by securing a brilliant win from fourth on the grid. After the summer break Rossi came back strongly with second places in Brno and Silverstone, when lightning struck twice. Before his second home Grand Prix, held in San Marino, the #46 rider suffered an enduro training incident and was forced to sit out the race after being diagnosed with a broken right leg. Nevertheless, the then 38-year old kept his determination and showed it by making an early comeback at the very next Grand Prix in Aragón, just 23 days after receiving surgery. Rossi’s highlight of the overseas races was the second place he took in Australia, with Viñales making it the team’s fourth double podium of the season, as he secured third. Rossi ultimately finished the season in fifth place in the rider standings.

2018 was undoubtedly the most challenging year Rossi and Yamaha faced together. The season started promising wi2018 was undoubtedly the most challenging year Rossi and Yamaha faced together. The season started promising with the Italian scoring podiums finishes in Qatar, Le Mans, Mugello, Catalunya, and at the Sachsenring. During the second half of the season he was unable to fight his way back onto the rostrum, though he gave very strong performances at the Malaysia and Valencia GP. His form in these last two GPs indicated that the YZR-M1 package was on the way up again. Rossi secured third place in the overall championship standings, leaving him eager to start the 2019 season at the front of the field.

2019 was a hard-fought season for Rossi as he struggled to find a consistently quick setup for his M1. A second place finish at round two in Argentina and second in both qualifying and the race in round three at COTA were the highlights of his season, with consistent top ten finishes throughout the year and a front row qualifying in Great Britain hinting at the potential yet to be unlocked within his bike.

For 2020 Rossi stayed with the Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP Team alongside Maverick Viñales, but the coronavirus pandemic had an impact on the Italian getting into a good rhythm. The Andalusian GP was a highlight, with Rossi standing on the podium in Jerez for the 15th time in his career. He went onto take three top five finishes over the next four races, but three consecutive non-finishes followed and he was look to bounce back ahead of the Aragon double-header. However, just before the 10th round, Rossi was sick and was forced to sit out both races. He returned in Valencia and ended the season with two points finishes.

Rossi will now move to the Petronas Yamaha SRT Team for 2021, bringing his most recent six-year tenure with the factory Yamaha squad to an end. His new teammate will be Franco Morbidelli, a talent who enjoyed a breakthrough season in 2020, and Rossi will likely play a key role in furthering his protege’s development.

Though Rossi is still chasing his tenth World Championship Title, he is already known as one of the greatest of all time. He equals Mike Hailwood and Carlo Ubbiali, who both wrote nine titles to their names in all classes, only Giacomo Agostini and Angel Nieto have more. Moreover, Rossi is the only rider to win premier class titles on five different types of motorcycles (500cc 4-cylinder two-stroke, 990cc 5-cylinder four-stroke, Yamaha 990cc 4-cylinder four-stroke, Yamaha 800cc 4-cylinder four-stroke and a Yamaha 1000cc 4-cylinder four-stroke).

 

Inspiration Friday: Ride Like Rossi

Personal Details:

Date of birth: 16-02-1979
Place of birth: Urbino, Italy
Nationality: Italian
Height: 181cm
Weight (kg): 69kg
Hobbies: Soccer, radio-controlled toys, rally racing

Total Races: 424 (322 x MotoGP, 32 x 500cc, 30 x 250cc, 30 x 125cc)
Victories: 115 (76 x MotoGP, 13 x 500cc, 14 x 250cc, 12 x 125cc)
Pole positions: 65 (51 x MotoGP, 4 x 500cc, 5 x 250cc, 5 x 125cc)
Podiums: 235 (176 x MotoGP, 23 x 500cc, 21 x 250cc, 15 x 125cc)
First race: 1989
First Grand Prix: Malaysia, 1996 (125cc)
First Pole position: Czech Republic, 1996 (125cc)

 

Career Summary:

2021: Petronas Yamaha SRT Team
2020:15th – MotoGP, Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP Team
2019: 7th – MotoGP, Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP Team
2018: 3rd – MotoGP, Movistar Yamaha MotoGP
2017: 5th – MotoGP, Movistar Yamaha MotoGP
2016: 2nd – MotoGP, Movistar Yamaha MotoGP
2015: 2nd – MotoGP, Movistar Yamaha MotoGP
2014: 2nd – MotoGP
2013: 4th – MotoGP, Yamaha Factory Racing
2012: 6th – MotoGP
2011: 7th – MotoGP
2010: 3rd – MotoGP, Fiat Yamaha Team
2009: Champion – MotoGP, Fiat Yamaha Team
2008: Champion – MotoGP, Fiat Yamaha Team
2007: 3rd – MotoGP, Yamaha Factory Racing
2006: 2nd – MotoGP, Yamaha Factory Racing
2005: Champion – MotoGP, Yamaha Factory Racing
2004: Champion – MotoGP
2003: Champion – MotoGP
2002: Champion – MotoGP World Championship
2001: Champion – 500cc World Championship
2000: 2nd – 500cc World Championship
1999: Champion – 250cc World Championship
1998: 2nd – 250cc World Championship
1997: Champion – 125cc World Championship
1996: 9th – 125cc World Championship
1995: Champion – 125cc Italian Championship
1994: Champion – 125cc Italian Sports Production Championship
1993: 3rd – 125cc Italian Sports Production Championship
1991: 4th – Italian Junior Go-Kart Championship
1990: Regional Go-Kart Championship – 9 wins
1989: First Go-Kart Race

 

Inspiration Friday: Ride Like Rossi

Valentino Rossi Rounds out MotoGP Career with a Tenth-place Finish in Valencia – Last Race for Rossi

Valentino Rossi brought his MotoGP career to a close this weekend with an emotional weekend at the Circuit Ricardo Tormo for the Gran Premio de la Comunitat Valenciana. The Doctor ended his illustrious career with a strong top-ten finish. World Champion Fabio Quartararo concluded his 2021 campaign with a fifth-place finish in Valencia

After 26-years of Grand Prix racing, 42-year-old Valentino Rossi made his 432nd and final MotoGP start this weekend as he brought his impressive career to a close. The 115 time race-winner and 199 time a podium finisher got his final race underway from tenth on the grid and was eager to finish on a high. Attacking from the beginning, the Italian claimed ninth by the end of the first lap. Trying to stick with the leading group, Rossi dropped behind the Ducatis of Johann Zarco and Enea Bastianini by lap nine, but that didn’t faze the experienced Italian.

Continuing to push on, the nine-times World Champion found himself back in the top ten at the mid-way stage and held off Yamaha counterpart Franco Morbidelli to eventually finish his career in tenth place.

World Champion Fabio Quartararo concluded his 2021 campaign with a fifth-place finish in Valencia. The Monster Energy Yamaha rider began the season closer from eighth on the grid and a bright start saw the Frenchman end the opening lap in sixth place.

Determined to join the top-five battle, Quartararo launched an attack on Jack Miller, a neat move at turn 14 promoted the 22-year-old to fifth, but Miller was quick to re-pass the Yamaha man. Locked in battle, the World Champion secured fifth place at turn four, but as the race went on dropped back to sixth.

An accident for another rider on lap 11 promoted him back to fifth place, where he eventually finished the Grand Prix, +5.439 seconds behind the winner.

Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP’s Franco Morbidelli began his final race of the 2021 season in 11th place. Dropping to 13th on lap one, Morbidelli pushed on, recovering to 11th by the half-way point. Following Rossi for the second half of the race, Morbidelli brought his factory M1 Yamaha home in 11th, securing five points.

Andrea Dovizioso completed his final race in PETRONAS colours with a 12th place finish. Dovizioso ran the majority of his race in 13th place but a charge saw him claim a season-best finish of 12th.

Fabio Quartararo’s championship-winning season saw him rack up a total of 278 points, finishing 26 points clear atop of the standings. Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP team-mate Franco Morbidelli secured 17th in the standings, despite missing five races through injury. Valentino Rossi’s 44 points saw him bow out of the championship in 18th place with Andrea Dovizioso securing 12 points during his five Grands Prix with Razlan Razali’s PETRONAS outfit.

Yamaha secured second in the constructors’ standings with a 309 points total while Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP missed out on the team’s championship, finishing second with 380 points.

There’s no rest for the Yamaha MotoGP teams as 2022 gets underway with the first of seven test days at Jerez this week. Monster Energy Yamaha will be joined by the newly-formed RNF Yamaha team as Darryn Binder makes his MotoGP debut.

Gran Premio Motul de la Comunitat Valenciana Race Result
1. Francesco Bagnaia – Ducati Lenovo Team
2. Jorge Martin – Pramac Racing +0.489
3. Jack Miller – Ducati Lenovo Team +0.823
4. Joan Mir – Team SUZUKI ECSTAR +5.214
5. Fabio Quartararo – Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP +5.439
6. Johann Zarco – Pramac Racing +6.993
7. Brad Binder – Red Bull KTM Factory Racing +8.437
8. Enea Bastianini – Avintia Esponsorama +10.933
9. Aleix Espargaro – Aprilia Racing Team Gresini +12.651
10. Valentino Rossi – PETRONAS Yamaha SRT +13.468
11. Franco Morbidelli – Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP +14.085
12. Andrea Dovizioso – PETRONAS Yamaha SRT +16.534
13. Alex Marquez – LCR Honda CASTROL +17.059
14. Miguel Oliveira – Red Bull KTM Factory Racing +18.221
15. Iker Lecuona – Tech 3 KTM Factory Racing +19.233
16. Maverick Viñales – Aprilia Racing Team Gresini +19.815
17. Luca Marini – SKY VR46 Avintia +28.860
18. Danilo Petrucci – Tech 3 KTM Factory Racing +32.169
NC. Alex Rins – Team SUZUKI ECSTAR +17 laps
NC. Takaaki Nakagami – LCR Honda IDEMITSU +23 laps

2021 MotoGP World Championship Standings
1. Fabio Quartararo – Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP 278 points
2. Francesco Bagnaia – Ducati Lenovo Team 252 points
3. Joan Mir – Team SUZUKI ECSTAR 208 points
4. Jack Miller – Ducati Lenovo Team 181 points
5. Johann Zarco – Pramac Racing 173 points
6. Brad Binder – Red Bull KTM Factory Racing 151 points
7. Marc Marquez – Repsol Honda Team 142 points
8. Aleix Espargaro – Aprilia Racing Team Gresini 120 points
9. Jorge Martin – Pramac Racing 111 points
10. Maverick Viñales – Aprilia Racing Team Gresini 106 points
11. Enea Bastianini – Avintia Esponsorama 102 points
12. Pol Espargaro – Repsol Honda Team 100 points
13. Alex Rins – Team SUZUKI ECSTAR 99 points
14. Miguel Oliveira – Red Bull KTM Factory Racing 94 points
15. Takaaki Nakagami – LCR Honda IDEMTISU 76 points
16. Alex Marquez – LCR Honda CASTROL 70 points
17. Franco Morbidelli – Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP 47 points
18. Valentino Rossi – PETRONAS Yamaha SRT 44 points
19. Luca Marini – SKY VR46 Avintia 41 points
20. Iker Lecuona – Tech 3 KTM Factory Racing 39 points
21. Danilo Petrucci – Tech 3 KTM Factory Racing 37 points
22. Stefan Bradl – Honda HRC 14 points
23. Michele Pirro – Ducati Lenovo Team 12 points
24. Andrea Dovizioso – PETRONAS Yamaha SRT 12 points
25. Dani Pedrosa – Red Bull KTM Factory Racing 6 points
26. Lorenzo Savadori – Aprilia Racing Team Gresini 4 points
27. Tito Rabat – Pramac Racing 1 point
28. Cal Crutchlow – Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP 0 points
29. Garrett Gerloff – PETRONAS Yamaha SRT 0 points
30. Jake Dixon – PETRONAS Yamaha SRT 0 points

2021 MotoGP Constructor’s Championship
1. Ducati 357 points
2. Yamaha 309 points
3. Suzuki 240 points
4. Honda 214 points
5. KTM 205 points
6. Aprilia 121 points

2021 MotoGP Team’s Championship
1. Ducati Lenovo Team 433 points
2. Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP 380 points
3. Team SUZUKI ECSTAR 307 points
4. Pramac Racing 288 points
5. Repsol Honda Team 250 points
6. Red Bull KTM Factory Racing 245 points
7. LCR Honda 146 points
8. Esponsorama Racing 143 points
9. Aprilia Racing Team Gresini 135 points
10. PETRONAS Yamaha SRT 96 points
11. Tech 3 KTM Factory Racing 76 points
Fabio Quartararo
Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP Position: 5th
“To be honest, I‘m satisfied because we were in a bad situation when we started on Friday morning, but we achieved quite a great pace today. We changed the bike in Warm Up this morning and that made it a bit better. It wasn‘t easy, but we achieved something that‘s pretty great. I wanted to have fun today more than wanting a good result, and I had fun today. So, I‘m super happy, because even if it wasn‘t the perfect weekend I hoped for, we were able to get a top-5 result. I enjoyed the race, and we finished the season in a good way.”
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Valentino Rossi
PETRONAS Yamaha Sepang Racing Team Position: 10th
“I didn’t expect that it could be a weekend like this. I was very worried for this weekend because I didn’t know how I felt and there was a lot of pressure with many things to do. It was fantastic, I received a lot of positive energy from all the people in the paddock and I had a lot of great surprises: from seeing all my bikes on Thursday, to all the VR46 Academy riders with my helmets today. I’m also happy because I was able to be strong in both Qualifying yesterday and in the race today, finishing in the top-ten. I enjoyed it a lot and it was the best way to finish. I am in the top ten best riders in the world and it means everything, because this result will never change. I also enjoyed the celebrations after the race. It was a long career and I want to say thanks to everybody.”
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Franco Morbidelli
Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP Position: 11th
“I was lucky enough to enjoy Valentino‘s last laps for the whole way as I was riding behind him. I feel really lucky for that. Before the race, I wanted to stay as far as possible from him. I didn‘t want to be involved in anything that could upset his final race, but when I found myself behind him, I just enjoyed it. I tried to push him and stay behind him. It was really, really fast, and difficult to overtake. At the end of the race, he made a step also, he accelerated his pace – it was just amazing! I feel really lucky, and it was a really nice race.”
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Andrea Dovizioso
PETRONAS Yamaha Sepang Racing Team Position: 12th
“We were much closer than we have been in other races today, so I’m happy to finish the season with that speed. We also worked well to improve the bike under braking, which meant I could take different lines. It was good for me that I could follow ‘Vale’ [Rossi] and Franco [Morbidelli] to learn how they ride the Yamaha, as they are very experienced with it. I’m very happy with today and it was a good way to finish the season.

“To be a team-mate of Rossi was strange, as I have always been in different teams to him, but it has been enjoyable. I tried to beat him but he was very strong and he always has something more to give in a race. It has been really nice to share the box with him at his final round and I feel lucky to have been part of it.”
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Massimo Meregalli
Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP, Team Director
“Overall, it was a difficult weekend, more than we could have expected. Fabio was able to get a good result considering his starting position. We found a setting on the bike for him that paid off. We‘re quite satisfied about that, but we finished 5 seconds behind the race winner. That will be the fuel for our motivation during the wintertime, to be stronger next year, which is already starting next week at the Jerez Test. But first there’s tonight‘s MotoGP Gala where we can celebrate Fabio’s championship win in his debut year with our team.

“Franky did a consistent race. We know his physical condition isn‘t back to his former form yet, but during this race he was able to keep a good pace from the beginning to the end. For sure he will be using the off-season to train so he can start the next season very competitively.

“We are all so happy for Valentino that he was able to finish his epic career with a top-10 result today. He did it at a track where he usually struggles a bit. But this time he had a great weekend and proved once again why he is called the ’Greatest of All Time‘. That‘s exactly what he is. We had the pleasure to work with him for many years. We will forever keep the amazing memories he gave us and wish him all the best. Ciao, Valentino!”
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Razlan Razali
PETRONAS Yamaha Sepang Racing Team, Team Principal
“Today was an emotional day for the team, especially as it was Rossi’s last dance after a glorious 26 years. We are truly honoured that he has ended his career with us and it will go down in the history books that the last team he rode for was PETRONAS Yamaha SRT. At the same time it is the team’s final race as well and it was good that Andrea could finish inside the points in 12th as well. It has been a great three years, with great highs and lows. We have made tremendous achievements in that time though.”

 

What is MotoGP?

MotoGP logo

The MotoGP Championship is the pinnacle class of world championship road racing. It developed primarily in Europe after the FIM (Federation Internationale de Motocyclisme) consolidated the regulations for motorcycle competition for the first time in 1949. In the past, the premier class was the 500cc class of the Road Race World Championships, but in 2002 the regulation was changed to create the MotoGP class in which 2-stroke machines of up to 500 cc and 4-stroke machines of up to 990 cc competed together.

What is MotoGP?
The regulation was changed again in 2004 to limit the MotoGP class to four-stroke machines only, and the displacement limit was reduced to 800 cc in the regulation from the 2007 season. Since then, new regulations have also made a single maker the sole supplier of tyres for MotoGP, limited the number of tyres that can be used by a team during race week and reduced the number of test days.

In 2010, regulations changed to limit the number of engines a single rider can use during the season to six. 2011 was the last for the 800cc machines, with regulations changing for 2012 to allow 1000cc bikes onto the grid.

A major change for the 2014 season was that all teams were required to source and use a standard MotoGP ECU. In 2015 it was decided that all engine management systems including injectors, bypass systems, variable intake systems and ignition must be operated exclusively by the original and unmodified ECU signal.

Other 2015 regulation changes see the minimum weight of a 1,000 cc machine will be reduced by 2 kg from 160kg to 158kg and the carbon brake discs must be one of the permitted sizes for outside diameter, that is: 320mm and 340mm. At certain circuits, such as Motegi, the use of 340mm carbon brake discs is mandatory for the race for safety reasons.

MotoGP rules dictate four-cylinder engines with a maximum bore size of 81mm. Each rider is allocated seven engines for the season, with no development work permitted during the season.

An allocation of 21 slick tyres, 10 of which are front tyres is given to each rider to cover the race and all practice and qualifying sessions. Of these 10 front tyres a maximum of six can be either specification A (hard) or specification B (soft). For the 11 rear slick tyre up to a maximum of five can be a specification A (hard) or a maximum of seven can be specification B (soft). There is a standard allocation of 10 wet tyres: five front wet tyres and five rear wet tyres of the standard specification. All riders have access to the same tyres, which for 2017 are manufactured by Michelin.

With all these changes, MotoGP is firmly in a new era. The machines achieve a maximum output of over 240 hp and reach speeds of over 340km/hr. The latest electronic control technology is employed throughout. Races are contested on tarmac circuits that are typically between 4-5km long, with a total race distance of between 110-120km taking around 40 minutes to complete.

A new split qualifying procedure was introduced in 2013, with the fastest riders from practice going into a pole shoot-out. The existing three 45-minute practice sessions remained, but the first half hour of qualifying became additional practice and does not count for the grid. Qualifying itself become two 15-minute sessions known as ‘qualifying practice 1’ and ‘qualifying practice 2’. QP1 commences 10 minutes after the end of the new practice four, with a further 10-minute break before QP2. The 10 fastest riders in the combined times from practices one, two and three go straight through to QP2. The rest of the field have to participate in QP1, from which the fastest two riders qualify for QP2, with the remainder forming the grid from 13th back. QP2 then decides the top 12 grid positions.

Italian riders, including Yamaha legends Valentino Rossi and Giacomo Agostini, have the best all-time records, winning a total of 20 titles in this premier class. Yamaha has a total of 16 titles, including ten in the GP500 and five in the MotoGP. Yamaha Factory Racing won the Triple Crown of Rider, Team and Manufacturer’s title three years consecutively, 2008 – 2010 and the Rider’s title again in 2012 and 2015.

2021 Yamaha YZF-R3 Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP Edition

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