Revival Cycles gives the Moto Guzzi V9 a Chopper Attitude: Build Update

Moto Guzzi offers its V9 model in two distinctly different editions: the chromed-up roadster christened Roamer and the blacked-out bad-boy Bobber. The stock V9s powerplant is a 90° transverse air- and oil-cooled 850cc v-twin engine with aluminum cylinder heads, cylinders, pistons, and one-piece Marelli electronic fuel injection system.

That is hooked up to the rear wheel via a six-speed transmission and shaft final drive. While the two stock models differ in aesthetics and visual character, they share a conventional overall configuration.

The designer/builders at Revival Cycles were drawn to the V9 as a platform for a build that could take the bike in an entirely different direction: a chopper.

Revival explains the design selection process: “So far on the Moto Guzzi V9 project we’ve all ridden the motorcycle in as-delivered condition to get a feel for the motorcycle’s personality and ergonomics. After a few group discussions, we decided the path forward on this build was Chopper. Something completely different, yet totally familiar. Taking the best elements of the V9 and pushing the style a whole new direction to show what’s possible. We started with a few concept sketches and design discussions to help refine the vision. Once we had a rough plan, the bike was torn down to its essentials so we could get to work.”

 

This has to be viewed in context; first, there just aren’t that many Moto Guzzi-based chops out there. That makes Revival’s plan for a V9 chopper unusual right from weld one. But that’s not where the originality ends. That plan includes a styling element more often seen in prototypes and certain roadracers, but not in choppers—monocoque bodywork—along with some mods to the rolling stock.

 

In a recent build progress update, Revival explained it this way, “The first step was getting the stance correct. The forks were raised in the triples and a vintage Avon Speedmaster was installed up front with a Firestone tire on the back. We wanted to keep the good looking and properly sized Guzzi V9 wheels as-is. Next a set of 7/8″ ape hangers were fitted to the bike so the original Guzzi controls can be shown off, while still getting the overall Chopper vibe just right. With a few key parts in place, the major task of bodywork was up next. Many hours were spent laying out the wire frame to get the overall shape and proportions just right before the heavy lifting could begin.”

 

With the chassis concept in place, the design for the monocoque bodywork could begin in earnest.

 

“The bodywork features an all-aluminum construction and was inspired by several other single bodywork motorcycles. The fuel tank is integrated with the seat pan, side covers and tail section. The Moto Guzzi gauge has been recess mounted into the fuel tank to keep the cockpit as minimal as possible, while still having a running/riding motorcycle. The fuel tank is very small to show off the Guzzi V-twin engine and keep the Chopper style. All of the bodywork/seat mounting has been fabricated along with the base structure. Next steps are to complete fab/weld out on the bodywork.”

 

“Once the bodywork is assembled we’ll fabricate the two into two exhaust system, finalize the fabrication on the front suspension, upholster the leather seat work and paint the finished bodywork to complete the Chopper look. Our goal is to have the motorcycle ready for display at Barber Vintage Fest, even if it isn’t 100% complete at that time,” Revival said in its recent project update.

 

The accompanying images take us inside the build so far. We can’t wait to see the final product!

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